WATCH: Trump Rushed Off Stage by Secret Service After 'Security Scare' in Reno

Trump returned to stage shortly after agents covered him and hurried him of event stage; Secret Service say no gun found.

Donald Trump was rushed off of the stage Saturday at an event in Reno, Nevada after what reports said was "a security scare."

WATCH: Trump rushed of stage by secret service after 'security scare' in Reno

The U.S. Secret Service said the incident began when someone shouted "gun" but no weapon was found. 

"Immediately in front of the stage, an unidentified individual shouted 'gun.' Secret Service agents and Reno Police Officers immediately apprehended the subject. Upon a thorough search of the subject and the surrounding area, no weapon was found," the Secret Service said in a statement.

In the video, the Republican presidential candidate is seen peering into the crowd when a security agent rushes to his side and seems to shield him when he is joined by another agent who rushes the New York real estate mogul off the stage.

A man, second right, is escorted by law enforcement officers moments after Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was rushed offstage by Secret Service agents during a campaign rally in Reno, Nev., on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016.
John Locher, AP

Trump retook to the stage shortly after and continued his address. "We will never be stopped," Trump said, picking up his rally speech, just three days before Tuesday's election.

Security guards and armed police subsequently escorted one man out of the venue.

The incident began when Trump noticed what he considered a heckler, saying it was someone "from the Hillary Clinton campaign." A few seconds later people near the stage began pointing at someone in the crowd near the front. Then agents took Trump away.

In a statement, Trump thanked the Secret Service, Reno and Nevada law enforcement for "their fast and professional response."

The incident occurred as Clinton and Trump make their closing arguments to American voters, crisscrossing the United States in hopes of winning over last-minute undecided voters and rallying their bases to turn out enthusiastically on Election Day.

A McClatchy-Marist opinion poll released on Saturday of voters nationwide showed Clinton leading by 1 percentage point compared to 6 percentage points in September. A Reuters/Ipsos tracking poll on Saturday showed Clinton ahead by 4 percentage points nationally compared to 5 points on Friday.