German Elections: Palestinian Terror Group on Ballot, as Porn Star Drops neo-Nazis

Move afoot to remove Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine from Marxist-Leninist party list; Ina Groll bows out, saying, ‘Everyone makes mistakes’

With the German national election less than a month away, the small Marxist-Leninist party of Germany (the MLPD) is running for the Bundestag together with a host of other organizations. One of them is well-known to the Israeli public – the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP).

“For the first time in its post-World War II history, a terrorist organization is asking for voters’ support,” wrote the Jewish-German weekly Judische Allgemeine this month.

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The MLPD is not represented in the Bundestag after falling short of the 5 percent vote-threshold required for sending a representative to the legislature in the last elections. Its alliance with the PFLP is evoking controversy in Germany. The Popular Front is known in Israel and other countries as a terrorist organization, having participated in sensation-seeking attacks, some of them with fatalities, directed against Israeli targets in Israel and overseas.

The list includes kidnaping and blowing up planes as well as the massacre at Lod airport in 1972 and hijacking of an Air France plane in 1976.

Its activities in Germany are negligible, apparently. Authorities in Germany have no knowledge of the group’s involvement in terrorist activity. However, from time to time the group organizes activities on German soil. Thus, one of its most famous activists, plane hijacker Leila Khaled, appeared in Wuppertal at a conference commemorating Land Day (in which Arab demonstrators were killed in Israel in 1976), intended to promote the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement.

Volker Beck of Germany's environmental party Die Gruenen (The Greens)  attends a session of the lower house of parliament Bundestag to vote on legalising same-sex marriage, in Berlin, Germany June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
FABRIZIO BENSCH/REUTERS

Volker Beck, a Green Party MP who is chairman of the German-Israeli parliamentary group in the Bundestag, said to German media: “It should not have been allowed to come to this, that an anti-Israel terror organization in Germany formed an election alliance and is an election choice. The federal Interior Ministry must quickly act and ban the PFLP.”

He said this constituted an attempt by a political party to legitimize a terror group. Beck is now looking into the question of whether the inclusion of the PFLP in the MLDP’s list is legal.

Quickie with neo-Nazis is over for porn star

At the other end of the political spectrum, German porno star Ina Groll, who, after the recent elections to the Bundestag, joined the neo-Nazi (NPD) party under the motto “ultra-nationalism can also be sexy,” has left the ultra-right scene, returning to her former profession.

“I’m no longer active in politics. I have no more connections with the right. Today I see things differently than I did in the past and I’ve learned a lot,” wrote Groll on her website, which carries her stage name, Kitty Blair. Groll, who is 32, has repented, writing: “Everyone makes mistakes. What is important is to learn from them and to be willing to embark on a new path.”

In 2013, shortly after the elections to the German parliament, Groll shocked the extreme right wing in Germany, which consists mainly of heavyset men with shaved heads, when she joined the NPD (National Democratic Party).

This party has been active in Germany since 1964, priding itself on its ultra-nationalist, racist platform. Many people refer to it as a neo-Nazi party. Its activity in Germany is legal although its activists are under surveillance by law enforcement. The party has no representation in the Bundestag and in the last elections did not cross the 5 percent threshold. It does, however, have a representative in the European parliament.

A supporter of the German far-right National Democratic Party (NPD) holds a flag depicting a German World War Two soldier as he takes part in a march in Berlin in this May 8, 2005 file photo.
REUTERS

Four years ago Groll, who was captivated by the charms of this party, declared on her Facebook page that she was abandoning her professional pursuits to promote a political ideology. “I’m fed up with exposing my body. From now on I’ll expose a policy of hate,” she wrote. From then on, for many months, her Facebook page promoted messages of hatred towards Muslims, Roma and migrants. She posed for many photos with extreme right-wing activists. Now, ahead of the general elections that will be held September 24,  there is no vestige of her short flirtation with neo-Nazis. Her home page mainly disseminates pornographic and erotic content.