How Did Jared Kushner Get Into Harvard, Anyway?

The author of a 2006 book called 'The Price of Admission' suggests Trump's son-in-law did not get into the prestigious Ivy League school on the strength of his grades and SAT scores alone.

Bloomberg

The Harvard graduate credentials of Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner may not be news to anyone. But The Guardian suggests Kushner may have bypassed the traditional selection process to get into the coveted Ivy League school.

A story by Daniel Golden links Kushner's acceptance to Harvard to a $2.5 million pledge made by his parents to the institution. Golden recalls these details from a 2006 book called "The Price of Admission" about a trend of rich Americans buying their offsprings' way to prestigious universities.

Golden quotes administrators at the high school Kushner attended in New Jersey as describing him as a "less-than-stellar" student. At the time when Kushner enrolled at Harvard the university accepted only one in nine applicants, currently the figure is one in 20, The Guardian says.

Documents obtained at the time when the book was published paint Charles Kushner, Jared Kushner's dad, as a real estate mogul of sorts who had control over some 25,000 New Jersey apartments, in additional to office, industrial, retail space and undeveloped land.

Charles Kushner was but one of more than 400 wealthy donors to Harvard, more than half of whom sent at least one child to the university, Golden says.

In response to the article, a spokeswoman for Kushner Companies, Risa Heller, said  allegations that Jared's admission to Harvard was related to a gift by his father to the school “is and always has been false”.  

Heller said the Kushners have donated more than $100m to universities, hospitals and charities, adding, "Jared Kushner was an excellent student in high school and graduated from Harvard with honors.’’