Italy’s National Jewish Museum Among Sites Donating Day of Proceeds to Earthquake Relief

The museum, which is under development, does not yet have a permanent exhibition, but announced it would donate its proceeds from visitors to its temporary exhibit on the Torah.

A victim is pulled out of the rubble following an earthquake in Amatrice, Italy, August 24, 2016.
Alessandra Tarantino, AP

The National Museum of Italian Judaism and the Shoah is among dozens of state museums and cultural sites that will donate all proceeds from Sunday’s visitors to aid earthquake victims and rescue efforts in central Italy.

The museum, which is under development, does not yet have a permanent exhibition, but announced it would donate its proceeds from visitors to its temporary exhibit on the Torah.

On Thursday, the culture minister of Italy announced that Sunday’s proceeds from state-run museums and archaeological sites all over the country would go to the area devastated by the quake that hit early Wednesday morning and urged Italians to visit them to show solidarity.

At least 291 people have been confirmed dead in the 6.2 magnitude temblor.

Meanwhile, more than 20 volunteers from the Israeli aid organization IsraAid have been working in the earthquake zone since Thursday along with other relief organizations, including volunteers from Islamic Relief Italia.

Italy’s national Jewish umbrella organization, UCEI, and the Rome Jewish community initiated a blood drive in Rome; among the donors was outgoing Israeli ambassador Naor Gilon. Local Jewish communities and UCEI have collected funds and material for relief operations, and UCEI opened a special bank account for earthquake relief donations.