Germany Wants to Rebuild a Synagogue Destroyed on Kristallnacht. Here Is Why It Shouldn't

Galit Noga-Banai
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Galit Noga-Banai

Over 80 years after its destruction, the Bornplatz Synagogue is now the subject of debate in Hamburg. The synagogue, which was dedicated in 1906, was once the largest and most magnificent in northern Germany. It was damaged on Kristallnacht, and razed a year later.

Until then, it served as a center for the Jewish community of the Grindel district, ensconced in the neighborhood near the university and the train station. A Talmud Torah once stood on the corner next to the demolished synagogue; it closed its doors in 1942. In 2007, the religious school reopened, now bearing the name of the community’s last chief rabbi, Rabbi Joseph Carlebach, who was murdered by the Nazis in 1942.

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