Egyptian Agrees to Leave U.S. After Arrest for Threatening Trump

Twenty-three-year-old Emadeldin Elsayed posted that he would be willing to serve a life sentence for killing the Republican frontrunner and that the world would thank him.

This undated file photo provided by Ohoud Ali Mohamed Nasr El Sayed shows her brother, Emadeldin, an Egyptian aviation student in the Los Angeles area.
AP

An Egyptian flight student who was arrested after posting threatening comments about Donald Trump on his Facebook page agreed Friday to leave the country by July.

Immigration authorities agreed to let Emadeldin Elsayed, 23, return to Egypt voluntarily instead of deporting him, so long as he departs by July 5. Elsayed, who is being held at a jail in Southern California, appeared at a hearing in immigration court in Los Angeles shackled and wearing a yellow jail jumpsuit.

His lawyer, Hani Bushra, told Immigration Judge Kevin Riley that he may seek another bond hearing for the aspiring pilot from Cairo because he believes Elsayed's detention is illegal.

U.S. Secret Service agents interviewed Elsayed about his post in early February, then returned to his Los Angeles-area flight school eight days later and told him federal prosecutors were not charging him with a crime but his visa had been revoked.

Immigration authorities then arrested Elsayed. He has been detained since Febuary 12 at an Orange County jail.

Elsayed wrote that he was willing to serve a life sentence for killing Trump and the world would thank him, said his lawyer, Hani Bushra.

Elsayed said he was angered by the Republican presidential contender's comments about banning Muslims from traveling to the United States, but never intended to harm anyone.

Trump has used especially tough talk on immigration during his campaign. The Republican presidential contender has vowed to build a wall along the entire Mexican border and called for a temporary ban on Muslims from entering the country.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement said in a statement that Elsayed was arrested because he violated "the terms of his admission to the United States." The agency did not provide further details.

Immigration authorities alleged in court filings that Universal Air Academy had tipped off federal officials to the Facebook post, Bushra said.

Alex Khatib, the flight school's owner, said he knew nothing of the case until federal agents showed up to interview and later detain Elsayed.

He said federal officials asked him to pull paperwork he had issued so Elsayed could study there, but that he would take him back if the government allowed.