Live Updates: Trump Sweeps Primary Contests, Clinton Wins Four of Five

Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at an campaign rally in front of his personal helicopter, Hagerstown, Maryland, April 24, 2016.
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at an campaign rally in front of his personal helicopter, Hagerstown, Maryland, April 24, 2016.Credit: Jim Bourg, Reuters
Updates

Clinton grabs at least 194 delegates with four wins

Hillary Clinton is collecting several dozen more delegates than Bernie Sanders on Tuesday after winning four out of five states.

With 384 delegates at stake, Clinton is assured of winning at least 194 for the night. Sanders will gain at least 129. Many delegates remain to be allocated, pending final vote tallies.

That means to date, she now has 1,622 delegates based on primaries and caucuses. Sanders has 1,282.

When including superdelegates, Clinton's lead is much bigger.

She has 2,141, or 90 percent of the 2,383 delegates needed to win the nomination. Sanders has 1,321.

Clinton needs to win less than 19 percent of the remaining delegates and uncommitted superdelegates to reach 2,383.

Sanders would need to win more than 81 percent of the remaining delegates and uncommitted superdelegates. He's only been winning 38 percent.

Trump: If Hillary were a man, I don't think she'd get five percent of vote

Republican Donald Trump says that Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton is only doing well in the election because of her gender.

"Frankly, if Hillary Clinton were a man, I don't think she'd get five percent of the vote," Trump told reporters. "The only thing she's got going is the woman's card. And the beautiful things is, women don't like her, Okay?"

Trump was speaking in Manhattan after sweeping primaries in all five states that voted Tuesday.

Both he and Clinton have high unfavorable ratings, and Trump has made clear that he intends to attack the woman he calls "Crooked Hillary" mercilessly if the pair wind up facing off in a general election.

Trump also suggested twice that Clinton's rival, Bernie Sanders, run as an independent.

Sanders acknowledges he has 'very narrow path' to nomination

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders says in an interview with The Associated Press that his campaign has a "very narrow path" to the nomination despite losses in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware on Tuesday.

Sanders says California's primary in June is "very important to us" and he thinks every voter should have "the right to vote for whom they want to see as president of the United States."

Even though his campaign is trailing Hillary Clinton, Sanders says "we are going to fight for every delegate" to the Democratic convention to influence the party's agenda.

Sanders notes that he won in Rhode Island, which was the only state in Tuesday's contests that allowed independents to participate in the Democratic primary. He says independents will be important in the fall election and superdelegates should take that into consideration.

Trump considers himself 'presumptive nominee'

Donald Trump says he considers himself the "presumptive nominee" of the Republican Party, despite being short of the delegates needed to claim the nomination.

Speaking after his sweep of all five of Tuesday's GOP primaries, the Republican front-runner reiterated his calls to rivals Ted Cruz and John Kasich to get out of the race.

Trump shifts focus to Clinton, calls on Sanders to run as independent

Donald Trump says that the Republican nomination contest is "over" as he turned his focus to his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

"I call her crooked Hillary," he said in a speech Tuesday in New York following his five-state sweep. He said of the Republican nomination contest: "it's over. As far as I'm concerned it's over."

He vowed to do more for women than Clinton will if elected president and he reiterated his criticism of her handling of the security situation at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi.

He repeatedly called on Clinton's Democratic rival, Bernie Sanders, to run as an independent, saying "I think he'd do great."

Van Hollen wins Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in Maryland.

Rep. Chris Van Hollen has won the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in Maryland.

Van Hollen won Tuesday night after a long and heated primary against Rep. Donna Edwards for the seat opening due to Sen. Barbara Mikulski's retirement at the end of her term.

The campaign became a polarizing battle over race, gender and personality as the two candidates sought to succeed Mikulski, the nation's longest-serving female senator. Both candidates represent House districts that include the suburbs of the nation's capital.

Van Hollen ran on his record as a pragmatic progressive who is able to reach across the political aisle to get things done. Edwards campaigned as a candidate more committed to holding liberal principals without settling for political deals.

Clinton looks ahead to convention after big wins

Celebrating several key wins Tuesday night, Hillary Clinton is looking to the Democratic convention, telling a crowd in the host city of Philadelphia that she'll be back.

Clinton told more than 1,300 people gathered at the Pennsylvania Convention Center that said she would be back with the most votes and pledged delegates and promised that "we will unify our party to win this election and build an America where we all rise together."

Clinton focused criticism on the Republican candidates, rather than primary opponent Bernie Sanders. She made a pitch to voters outside the Democratic party, suggesting some may not be happy with the Republican options.

"If you are a Democrat an independent or a thoughtful Republican you know that their approach is not going to build an America where we increase opportunity or decrease inequality," Clinton said.

Sanders projected to win Rhode Island Democratic primary

Bernie Sanders has won the Democratic presidential primary in Rhode Island, offering the Vermont senator modest gains in the race against front-runner Hillary Clinton.

Sanders' win Tuesday blocks a potential sweep of the day's five races by Clinton, who has already won three out of the five contests.

But the former Secretary of State entered Tuesday's five primaries having already accumulated 82 percent of the delegates needed to win her party's nomination. While she can't win enough delegates to officially knock Sanders out of the race this week, her gains could make it virtually impossible for him to catch up to her in the remaining contests.

There are 384 Democratic delegates up for grabs in Tuesday's races in Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Clinton wins Democratic primary in Pennsylvania

Hillary Clinton has won the Democratic presidential primary in Pennsylvania, further solidifying her footing in the race against Bernie Sanders.

Leading up to Tuesday's contest, Clinton had campaigned extensively in the state, which she often refers to as her ancestral home.

The former Secretary of State entered Tuesday's five primaries having already accumulated 82 percent of the delegates needed to win her party's nomination. While she can't win enough delegates to officially knock Sanders out of the race this week, she can erase any lingering doubts about her standing.

There are 384 Democratic delegates up for grabs in Tuesday's five contests. Earlier Tuesday, Clinton won the races in Maryland and Delaware.

Trump sweeps primary contests, Clinton wins Maryland and Delaware

Donald Trump has won the Republican primaries in Rhode Island and Delaware, sweeping all five of Tuesday's contests.

Hillary Clinton has also won her second contest of the night, winning the Democratic primary in Delaware.

The two front-runners were positioned to do well, further extending their leads against their respective rivals and bringing them closer to their party nominations.

Cruz says race moving to 'favorable terrain'

Ted Cruz says the race for the White House is now moving back to more "favorable terrain" like Indiana.

Cruz chose to speak Tuesday night in Indiana, instead of any of the five Northeastern states that were voting Tuesday.

Trump claimed early wins in Pennsylvania, Connecticut and Maryland as polls in those three states closed.

Cruz spoke on the floor of a nearly 100-year-old basketball court where the 1986 film "Hoosiers" was shot. Cruz referenced the film about a small town team's underdog victory in the state tournament, saying "There is nothing that Hoosiers cannot do."

Cruz is hoping to rebound next week in Indiana and is focused on campaigning in the state ahead of its May 3 primary.

Trump wins PA, MD, CT by significant margins

Donald Trump has won the Republican presidential primaries in Pennsylvania, Connecticut and Maryland, giving the billionaire businessman a boost in a critical night as he seeks to shut out his opponents.

Hillary Clinton has also won the Democratic primary in Maryland.

Clinton entered Tuesday's five primaries having already accumulated 82 percent of the delegates needed to win her party's nomination. While she can't win enough delegates to officially knock Bernie Sanders out of the race this week, she can make it virtually impossible for him to catch up to her in the remaining contests.

Trump's win in Pennsylvania, the biggest prize in Tuesday's five contests, lends a boost to his embattled campaign which is facing a growing challenge from rivals Ted Cruz and John Kasich who announced this week that they are teaming up to thwart his rise.

While the Republican winner in Pennsylvania gets 17 delegates up front, the other 54 are directly elected by voters. They are allowed to support any candidate they choose at the national convention, but their names are listed on the ballot with no information about whom they support, meaning that voters who haven't studied up on their choices will be voting blind.

Baltimore precincts delay voting by an hour

A judge ordered four Baltimore precincts to stay open an hour late Tuesday because they were late in opening, delaying the release of results in Maryland primary until 9 P.M.

Rep. Donna Edwards, a candidate for the Democratic nomination for the state's open U.S. Senate seat, filed a request with the Baltimore Circuit Court to keep polling places in the city open until 10 P.M. because of the morning delays.

After Tuesday evening hearing that was disrupted by a small fire at the courthouse complex, Judge Althea Handy ruled that only four polling places would be kept open late.

However, the State Board of Elections will not release any results while any polling places remain open, so it won't release the results for Maryland's counties, even though their precincts were to all close at 8 P.M.

Clinton highlights manufacturing plans in Indiana

Hillary Clinton is spending much of Tuesday in Indiana promoting her plans for manufacturing and job creation.

Speaking at AM General, a car production plant in Mishawaka, Indiana, Clinton said she wanted to "revitalize manufacturing" as president. While she has largely steered clear of attacks on primary opponent Bernie Sanders, Clinton took one swipe at him, repeating a critique that he did not vote to fund the auto industry bailout.

Clinton said she doesn't know "we would be if we had walked away from the auto industry. She added her "esteemed opponent in this primary voted not to provide the funding the auto industry needed."

Sanders has accused Clinton of mischaracterizing his record on the issue.

Clinton also pledged to bring people together as president, saying that "anger is not a plan."

Most GOP voters say opponents aren't driving force of vote

Most Republicans going to the polls in three states Tuesday say they are voting for their candidate, rather than against his opponents.

Only a quarter of voters in Connecticut and Maryland say they voted for someone because they opposed the other candidates. And in Pennsylvania, even fewer — less than one in five — say they were casting a negative vote, according to early results of exit polls conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research.

Pennsylvania GOP voters are not quite so sanguine. While over a third would be excited by Trump Administration, the idea scares a quarter of voters. Few voters have extreme emotions about Cruz or Kasich. While either candidate's victory would prompt excitement for less than 10 percent of voters, each would produce fear in less 20 percent of voters.

Exit poll finds Pennsylvania Democrats energized, opposite for GOP

Most Democratic voters in Pennsylvania casting ballots on Tuesday say they've been energized by the closely contested primary between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

But Pennsylvania Republicans say the opposite about the heated contest between billionaire businessman Donald Trump, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

That's according to exit polls conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research.

About seven in 10 voters in Pennsylvania say the Democratic campaign has energized the party rather than divided it, while about 6 in 10 GOP voters say the Republican campaign this year has divided the party.

Only 4 in 10 Republican voters say they've been energized.

Harry Reid: Sanders has no path to nomination

Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid said Tuesday he does not think Bernie Sanders has a path to winning the Democratic presidential nomination.

Responding to questions at his weekly news conference Reid declined to suggest Sanders should drop out or cede the ground to Hillary Clinton, who's expected to post a strong showing in primaries Tuesday in Maryland, Pennsylvania and elsewhere.

The Nevada Democrat said Sanders is a good person who "has run a campaign that I think we've all recognized has been unique and powerful, and I think Bernie should do what he wants to do."

But asked whether Sanders has a path to the nomination Reid did not equivocate. "No, I do not," he said.

"Bernie is going to do what he feels is appropriate and I have every confidence that Bernie, his No. 1 issue is not him, it's the country," Reid added.

Sanders links Clinton to Trump in latest fundraising pitch

Bernie Sanders is making his latest fundraising pitch by using a photograph of Hillary Clinton smiling up at Donald Trump that was snapped when she attended his wedding to Melania in 2005.

The Sanders email, signed by campaign manager Jeff Weaver and carrying the subject line "Trump," does not elaborate on the photo. It notes that "no matter what the Clinton campaign says, there is one candidate in this race Donald Trump said would make a great president" - meaning Clinton.

Weaver also writes that Clinton allies are accusing Sanders supporters of helping Trump by prolonging the Democratic primary.

The Sanders email arrives on a day when the Republican presidential primary leader provocatively wrote on Twitter that Sanders "has been treated terribly by the Democrats" and should run as an Independent.

Sanders faces increasingly long odds in the Democratic primary, with Clinton ahead of him both in pledged delegates awarded to state contest winners and in "super delegates" who also weigh in.

Comments