LIVE UPDATES: Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump Win Big in New Hampshire

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Bernie Sanders after winning the New Hampshire primary, Concord, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.
Bernie Sanders after winning the New Hampshire primary, Concord, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AFP
Updates

How delegate count shakes out after New Hampshire primary

Bernie Sanders will win at least 13 of the Democratic delegates in New Hampshire and Hillary Clinton will win at least nine. Two delegates haven't yet been allocated.

In the overall race for delegates, Clinton has 394, thanks in large part to endorsements from superdelegates — party officials who can support the candidate of their choice.

Sanders has 42 delegates.

It takes 2,382 delegates to win the Democratic nomination for president.

In the Republicans race, Donald Trump will win at least 10 delegates in New Hampshire and John Kasich will win at least three. Ted Cruz and Jeb Bush will both win at least two, with six delegates still to be allocated.

In the overall race for delegates, Trump leads with 17, Cruz has 10, Marco Rubio has seven, Kasich has four and Bush has three.

It takes 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination.

Hillary Clinton with her family after the New Hampshire primary, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: Reuters

Ted Cruz sees 'conservative grassroots' as New Hampshire winner

Donald Trump may have captured the GOP presidential primary in New Hampshire and John Kasich came next, but Ted Cruz sees a different real winner of the contest.

The Texas senator — who won the leadoff Iowa caucuses but is fighting for third in New Hampshire — says it's the "conservative grassroots."

Cruz says he's proved the critics wrong for says a conservative couldn't do well in New Hampshire.

Now, he says he's focused on upcoming contests in South Carolina, Nevada and across the South in early March.

Ted Cruz after the New Hampshire primary in Hollis, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AP

Disappointed Rubio blames himself for New Hampshire finish

Marco Rubio says he's disappointed in his performance Tuesday in New Hampshire's Republican presidential primary, and he's blaming himself.

And the Florida senator — who finished a surprising second in the leadoff Iowa caucuses — says he has a good idea why he's in a fight for third place with Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and former Florida. Gov. Jeb Bush.

Rubio is pointing to his performance in the last debate before the primary.

He tells supporters: "I did not do well on Saturday night."

Marco Rubio in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AP

Christie going back to New Jersey to reassess 2016 bid

Republican Chris Christie says he's heading home to New Jersey to "take a deep breath" and take stock of his struggling presidential bid.

The New Jersey governor had banked on a strong finish in Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, but he's on track to end up far off the pace despite holding more than 70 town halls events over the past few months.

It's a tough blow for a candidate whose campaign had trouble from the start about raising money and building support in a crowded field dominated by another brash East Coaster: businessman Donald Trump.

Christie tells supporters that he'll wait to see the final New Hampshire results before making a decision about the way ahead.

But he says he can do that best from home, and not a hotel room in South Carolina — the site of the next Republican contest.

Chris Christie in Londonderry, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AP

Trump vows to make America great again in victory speech

"Wow, wow, wow, wow," Donald Trump declared, savoring his victory at a campaign rally before promising swift action as president on the economy, trade, health care, drug abuse and more.

"We are going to do something so good and so fast and so strong and the world is going to respect us again. Believe me."

Trump says that America under his leadership will "start winning again."

Trump is telling supporters that he'll be the "greatest jobs president God ever created."

He's promising that if he's commander in chief, he'll "knock the hell" out of the Islamic State group and negotiate what he says would be better trade deals.

A Trump presidency, he says, would mean "nobody is going to mess with us."

Donald Trump celebrating his New Hampshire victory, Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: Reuters

Jeb Bush unmoved by Kasich's strong NH showing

Jeb Bush's campaign doesn't think much of rival John Kasich's second-place showing in New Hampshire's Republican presidential primary.

Kasich finished behind Donald Trump. Bush — a former Florida governor — is in a close race with two senators — Ted Cruz of Texas and Marco Rubio of Florida — for third.

Bush spokesman Tim Miller says Kasich "ran a one-state campaign" in New Hampshire and doesn't have "a viable path" to the nomination.

The next Republican contest is in South Carolina later in February, and Miller says the Bush campaign feels "very confident about our position" in the state.

As for Kasich, Miller contends that the former congressman "doesn't have a constituency past New Hampshire."

Jeb Bush supporters in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: Reuters

Bernie Sanders set to meet Rev. Al Sharpton in New York

He's won in New Hampshire and now Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders plans to meet with Rev. Al Sharpton over breakfast in New York City on Wednesday.

That's according to two people who were briefed on the meeting. They are telling The Associated Press that the get-together is set for the famed Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem.

They spoke on condition of anonymity because the information had not yet been publicly released.

Sharpton isn't immediately responding to a request for comment.

Bernie Sanders after winning the New Hampshire primary, Concord, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: Reuters

Clinton congratulates Sanders, acknowledges she has to win over younger voters

The fight goes on for Hillary Clinton.

Even after losing to Bernie Sanders in the Democratic presidential primary in New Hampshire on Tuesday, Clinton is promising to take her fight for the nomination to the rest of the country.

And if she feels spurned by New Hampshire voters, she's not showing it to supporters in Hooksett, New Hampshire.

She tells them: "I still love New Hampshire, and I always will."

Clinton, 68, congratulated Sanders, 74, in a speech to supporters. She defended her progressive stances and vowed to be the candidate who fixes problems and not just state them. She acknowledged she had work to do winning over young voters. 

"People have every right to be angry but they're also hungry, they're hungry for solutions," she said. "I will work harder than anyone to actually make the changes that make your lives better." 

Hillary Clinton after losing the New Hampshire primary, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AP

Exit polls shed light on voters in NH's GOP race

Exit polls are helping shed some light on the various strands of support among voters in New Hampshire's Republican presidential primary.

Donald Trump is backed by voters looking for an outsider and those who made up their minds a while ago.

John Kasich does best with voters looking for a candidate with political experience — along with moderates, better educated voters and those who made their vote decision in the past few days.

Ted Cruz is supported by many voters who are very conservative and evangelical Christians.

Marco Rubio does best among voters for whom experience and electability is important.

Voters who value experience are also inclined to support Jeb Bush.

A Marco Rubio supporter in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AP

John Kasich projected to finish second in GOP primary

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has finished second in New Hampshire's Republican presidential primary.

There's a tight race for third among Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. It's still too close to call right now.

Kasich emerged from the pack of candidates to finish behind billionaire businessman Donald Trump on Tuesday night.

Kasich's campaign manager says he expects an increased flow of contributions to the candidate's campaign after the strong showing.

John Kasich at a polling station in Concord, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: Bloomberg

Trump to take delegate lead in GOP 2016 race

Thanks to his New Hampshire win, Donald Trump will take the lead in the race for delegates for the Republican National Convention.

It won't be much of a lead.

There are only 23 delegates at stake in New Hampshire's Republican primary, and they are awarded proportionally, based on the statewide vote.

Trump will win at least nine. The final tally depends on how many candidates get more than 10 percent of the vote, the threshold needed to qualify for delegates.

Trump started the night trailing Ted Cruz by one delegate.

Donald Trump supporters in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AP

How did Bernie Sanders do it in New Hampshire?

How did Bernie Sanders do it in New Hampshire?

According to exit polls, he won the Democratic presidential primary Tuesday by getting a majority of votes from both men and women, independents and voters under 45.

Rival Hillary Clinton is backed a majority of voters aged 65 and older and those with incomes over $200,000.

Independents make up nearly 4 in 10 voters in the primary, and Sanders is winning nearly three-quarters of their votes.

Clinton campaign manager: Nomination will likely be won in March

Hillary Clinton's campaign manager said on Tuesday the Democratic nomination for the 2016 presidential election would "very likely" be decided in March, and that the support of black and Hispanic voters would be key to victory. 

"It will be very difficult, if not impossible, for a Democrat to win the nomination without strong levels of support among African American and Hispanic voters," campaign manager Robby Mook wrote in a memo titled "March Matters." 

"The nomination will very likely be won in March, not February, and we believe that Hillary Clinton is well positioned to build a strong - potentially insurmountable - delegate lead next month," he said.

Hillary Clinton and her daughter Chelsea visit a polling place in Manchester, New Hampshire February 9, 2016.Credit: Reuters

Add more delegates to Sanders' column after NH

Bernie Sanders' victory in New Hampshire means he's assured of a majority of the state's pledged delegates.

With 24 at stake, Sanders stands to gain at least 13. Hillary Clinton will receive at least seven.

Clinton remains ahead in the overall delegate count due to support from superdelegates — the party officials who can support the candidate of their choice.

Including superdelegates nationwide, Clinton has amassed at least 392 delegates and Sanders at least 42.

The magic number to clinch the nomination is 2,382.

Bernie Sanders in Concord, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AFP

New Hampshire official seeing turnout higher than in 2008

New Hampshire's secretary of state says voter turnout in Tuesday's presidential primary is likely to be slightly higher than in 2008.

Bill Gardner predicted several days ago that roughly 282,000 Republican ballots cast would be and 268,000 Democratic ballots cast.

He says his visits to various polling places Tuesday lead him to believe his predictions are on par.

Final primary polls in New Hampshire close soon

The clock is ticking in New Hampshire: The final polls are set to close at 8 P.M. in the first-in-the-nation primary contest of the 2016 presidential election.

New Hampshire has 1.33 million residents. More than 870,000 are registered to vote.

Polls started opening at 7 A.M., except for a few communities that begin voting just after midnight.

Nearly half of NH voters made up their mind in past week

Nearly half of the voters in Tuesday's Republican primary in New Hampshire are saying they made up their mind in the last week. On the Democratic side? More than half say they decided before that.

The findings are among some of the early results of the exit poll conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and the television networks.

Voters wait in line to vote in Concord, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: Bloomberg

Rubio already toward next primaries with a $1.5M super PAC ad buy

An outside group that's helping Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio is spending more than $1.5 million on digital and media advertisements in South Carolina and Nevada — the next states on the 2016 election calendar.

The new expenditures are by Conservative Solutions PAC, a super political action committee that faces no contribution limits.

All but about $200,000 is for South Carolina. That's according to reports filed with the Federal Election Commission.

Conservative Solutions is the second-most-active super PAC in the presidential race so far. Only Right to Rise, which is boosting Republican Jeb Bush, has spent more on television and radio.

An anti-Marco Rubio demonstrator at a polling station in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: Bloomberg

Clinton campaign denies staffing shake-up in works

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's campaign chair denied a Monday report that she is considering staff changes after the New Hampshire nominating contest on Tuesday.

"There is zero truth to what you may be reading. It's wrong. Hillary stands behind her team, period," Chairman John Podesta tweeted.

Podesta was responding to a Politico report that Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, had planned to reassess staffing and strategy after the first four primaries but are becoming increasingly critical of their aides and demanded the evaluation sooner.

The former secretary of state would be more inclined to add new staff rather than fire current employees, according to the Politico story, which cited six unnamed sources.

Hillary Clinton and her daughter Chelsea visit a polling place in Manchester, New Hampshire February 9, 2016.Credit: Reuters

Half of New Hampshire Democrat voters dissatisfied with federal government

Voters in New Hampshire's primary are deeply unhappy with the way the federal government is working, according to early results of the exit poll conducted by Edison Research for the Associated Press and television networks.

Half of Democratic voters said they're dissatisfied with the way government is working, with another 1 in 10 saying they're angry. That's even higher among Republican primary voters, with 9 in 10 voters saying they're either dissatisfied or angry.

About a third of Republican voters said the most important quality in a candidate is someone who shared their values, while about the same proportion said it was someone who could bring about needed change.

Democratic voters said honesty, experience and someone who cares about people like them were the most important qualities in a candidate.

The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research as voters left their polling places at 44 randomly selected sites in New Hampshire. Preliminary results include interviews with 1434 Democratic primary voters and 1257 Republican primary voters and have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

Outside a polling station in Londonderry, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AP

Half of New Hampshire GOP voters feel betrayed by candidates

Republican voters in Tuesday's New Hampshire primary are much more negative about their politicians than Democrats are about theirs, according to early results of the exit poll conducted by Edison Research for the Associated Press and television networks. Half of Republicans said they feel betrayed by politicians from the Republican Party, while fewer than 2 in 10 Democrats say they feel betrayed by Democratic politicians.

Three in 10 Republican voters said the economy was the most important issue facing the country, similar to the percentages saying government spending and terrorism.

Three in 10 Democratic primary voters said the economy was the most important issue facing the country, while a similar share said income equality was most important.

The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research as voters left their polling places at 44 randomly selected sites in New Hampshire. Preliminary results include interviews with 1434 Democratic primary voters and 1257 Republican primary voters and have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

A polling station in Londonderry, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AP

Trump accuses Cruz of being 'worst kind of Washington insider'

Donald Trump is airing a new television ad that bashes Ted Cruz as "the worst kind of Washington insider."

The two candidates are after the same voters, people who want to shake up the federal government by electing an "outsider" president.

The 30-second spot that started airing Tuesday says Cruz of "talks from both side of his mouth" on allowing immigrants who are in the country illegally to stay, and took "sweetheart" loans from Wall Street banks when he ran for Senate in 2012. Then the narrator says Cruz's presidential campaign employed "dirty tricks" when it sent word to Iowans on the night of that state's caucuses that Ben Carson might be dropping out.

Cruz is "the worst kind of Washington insider, who just can't be trusted," the Trump ad concludes, showing Cruz's "TrusTED" campaign slogan.

Trump's latest commercial is part of a nearly $500,000 ad buy there.

South Carolina is the next state to vote in the GOP nomination fight, on Feb. 20.

Donald Trump greets supporters at a polling place for the presidential primary in Manchester, New Hampshire, February 9, 2016. Credit: Reuters

Cruz: Trump resorts to profanity since he can't defend his record

Ted Cruz says Donald Trump has no choice but to engage in profanity because the billionaire businessman can't defend his record.

A day earlier, Trump used a vulgar term for a coward to refer to Cruz, who briefly addressed the insult Tuesday afternoon as he greeted voters inside Manchester's Red Arrow Diner.

"Part of the reason that Donald engages in insults is because he can't discuss the substance. He can't defend his record. For example, a vote for Donald Trump is a vote for Obamacare," Cruz told reporters as he walked into the diner.

Trump has said that's a "lie." Cruz charges that Trump supports universal health care that could lead to health care rationing.

Cruz says, "Donald can't defend that. So instead, his approach is to engage in a profane insult. I'm not going to respond in kind."

Ted Cruz in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AFP

Christie won't say if campaign will continue after NH primary

Chris Christie isn't saying whether his campaign will continue after Tuesday's GOP New Hampshire primary.

At a noontime stop at a Derry restaurant, Christie refused to say what place he needs to come in at a minimum to continue his campaign.

"I don't get into that stuff. Next!" he said, calling on the next reporter.

Christie has hung virtually all of his White House hopes on a strong showing in New Hampshire. Other candidates, such as Jeb Bush, have said their campaigns will continue into the next states to vote, South Carolina and Nevada.

Chris Christie in Londonderry, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.Credit: AP

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