Live South Carolina Updates: Hillary Clinton Scores Resounding Primary Win Over Bernie Sanders

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Hillary Clinton's speech following her victory in South Carolina, Feb. 27, 2016.
Hillary Clinton's speech following her victory in South Carolina, Feb. 27, 2016.Credit: AFP
Updates

Clinton wins 39 of 53 delegates in South Carolina

Hillary Clinton's South Carolina win has given her a solid lead in The Associated Press delegate count.

With 53 delegates at stake, Clinton gained 39 delegates. Bernie Sanders picked up just 14.

Including superdelegates, the AP count shows that Clinton now has a total of 544 delegates and Sanders has 85.

It takes 2,383 delegates to win the Democratic nomination.

Supporters cheer as the television networks project Hillary Clinton as the winner of the South Carolina at a primary night party in Columbia, South Carolina, Feb. 27, 2016. Credit: Reuters

After landing in Minnesota, Sanders shifts focus to Super Tuesday

Bernie Sanders is telling reporters after landing in Minnesota that "in politics on a given night, sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. Tonight we lost."

Sanders is congratulating Hillary Clinton "on a very strong victory" in the South Carolina primary. He notes that more than 800 delegates are at stake in 11 contests on Super Tuesday and says, "We intend to win many, many of them."

Sanders is speaking Saturday night to supporters in Rochester, Minnesota. The state holds its caucuses on Tuesday and is among those Sanders is targeting for victory.

Bernie Sanders talks to reporters about the results of the South Carolina primary as he steps off his campaign jet on the tarmac of the airport in Rochester, Minnesota, Feb. 27, 2016.Credit: Reuters

Clinton rout suggets voters are past heated 2008 content with Obama

Hillary Clinton's sweeping South Carolina victory suggests voters in the state put aside any lingering tensions from her heated 2008 contest with Barack Obama.

In 2008, former President Bill Clinton made statements during the campaign that were seen by some, including influential South Carolina Rep. James Clyburn, as questioning the legitimacy of the black presidential contender.

This time around, Clyburn endorsed Hillary Clinton, and her husband was well-received as he traveled the state on her behalf. She focused on issues with particular resonance in the black community and held an emotional event with black mothers whose children died in shootings. She won overwhelming support from black voters in the primary Saturday.

7 in 10 liberal voters back Clinton, exit polls show

Updated exit polling from the South Carolina Democratic presidential primary indicates Hillary Clinton won a large majority of black voters, most women and voters 25 and older. She was backed by both highly educated voters and those without a college degree, by those with high household incomes and the less affluent.

Rival Bernie Sanders was supported by voters under 25 and those who identified themselves as independent.

In earlier contests, liberals tended to support Sanders. But in South Carolina, Clinton received a majority regardless of ideology: she got 7 in 10 liberals — including those who consider themselves very liberal — 7 in 10 conservatives, and 8 in 10 moderates.

Hillary Clinton's speech following her victory in South Carolina, Feb. 27, 2016.Credit: AFP

Clinton wins at least 37 delegates in South Carolina

After her big victory, Hillary Clinton has won at least 37 delegates in South Carolina. Bernie Sanders has gained at least 12.

Four delegates remain to be allocated in four congressional districts.

Including superdelegates, the party insiders who can back a candidate of their choice, Clinton holds a much bigger advantage.

She now has 542 delegates, according to AP's count. Sanders has at least 83.

It takes 2,383 delegates to win the nomination.

Hillary Clinton's speech following her victory in South Carolina, Feb. 27, 2016.Credit: AFP

Clinton swipes at Trump: 'America has never stopped being great'

The Democratic front-runner is taking a swipe at the Republican one.

In her South Carolina victory speech, Democratic contender Hillary Clinton said America does not need to be made great again, because "America has never stopped being great." She said America needs to be made "whole again."

In addition to keying off of Donald Trump's slogan, Clinton denounced the idea of building a wall, as Trump wants to do along the Mexican border. She says the country needs to be tearing down barriers, to equality and opportunity.

Clinton was speaking at her victory rally after scoring a commanding win in the South Carolina Democratic primary.

Hillary Clinton's speech following her victory in South Carolina, Feb. 27, 2016.Credit: AFP

Clinton gives victory speech: 'Tomorrow this campaign goes national'

Hillary Clinton is relishing her big South Carolina win.

She's telling her victory rally that "tomorrow this campaign goes national" as she and rival Bernie Sanders compete for the Super Tuesday states.

To cheers, Clinton said: "When we stand together there is no barrier too big to break."

Clinton to receive at least 31 of 53 South Carolina delegates

Hillary Clinton's victory in South Carolina means she will pick up most of the state's delegates, widening her overall lead in AP's delegate count.

With 53 delegates at stake, Clinton will receive at least 31. Bernie Sanders will pick up at least 12.

Clinton already holds a large lead among superdelegates, the party leaders and members of Congress who can support any candidate. Including superdelegates, Clinton now has at least 536 delegates, according to AP's count. Sanders has at least 83.

It takes 2,383 delegates to win the nomination.

Supporters cheer as the television networks project Hillary Clinton as the winner of the South Carolina at a primary night party in Columbia, South Carolina, Feb. 27, 2016. Credit: Reuters

Sanders congratulates Clinton: 'This campaign is just beginning'

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is congratulating Hillary Clinton on her victory in South Carolina. But he says the campaign is just beginning.

Bernie Sanders speaks at a campaign rally in Grand Prairie, Texas, Feb. 27, 2016.Credit: Reuters

Sanders notes that he won a "decisive victory" in New Hampshire and she did the same in South Carolina.

Now it's on to Super Tuesday, he says. Sanders says his "grassroots political revolution is growing state by state," and he "won't stop now."

Clinton tweets 'thank you' moments after declared winner

Moments after she clinched a win in the South Carolina Democratic primary, Hillary Clinton tweeted: "To South Carolina, to the volunteers at the heart of our campaign, to the supporters who power it: thank you."

Hillary Clinton projected to win South Carolina's Democratic primary

Hillary Clinton has won the Democratic presidential primary in South Carolina. She won the overwhelming support of black voters on her way to a commanding victory over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

The win for Clinton is her third in the first four contests of the 2016 campaign. And it gives her a blowout to match Sanders' dominating triumph in New Hampshire.

Early results of exit polls taken for The Associated Press and television networks find that Clinton won the support of 8 in 10 African-Americans, who made up the majority of voters in Saturday's primary.

That bodes well for Clinton headed into Super Tuesday contests across the South, where several states are home to large populations of black voters.

Sanders slams Clinton on unreleased paid speech transcripts

Bernie Sanders has some sharp words for Hillary Clinton as she resists releasing transcripts of her paid speeches to big banks.

He spoke before about 7,000 people in Grand Prairie, Texas, near Dallas, on Saturday, as people in South Carolina voted in their state's Democratic primary.

Sanders says: "If you're going to give speeches behind closed doors to Wall Street groups like Goldman Sachs and if you're going to get paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for that speech, it must be a great speech and you want to share it with the American people."

Clinton has said she'll share transcripts of her lucrative speeches when other candidates do the same. Sanders drew applause when he said: "I'm making my transcripts available. There are none."

Sanders predicts he'll have a surprise showing Tuesday in Texas, the largest of the Super Tuesday states voting.

Bernie Sanders speaks at a campaign rally in Grand Prairie, Texas, Feb. 27, 2016.Credit: Reuters

6 in 10 voters are African-American, exit polls show

Black voters may make up an even bigger share of the electorate in the South Carolina Democratic primary than they did in 2008, when Barack Obama was running. Early exit polls in the contest Saturday suggest about 6 in 10 voters are black.

In the surveys, nearly half of voters — whether black or white — say racial relations have deteriorated in the last few years. Voters in South Carolina are more worried about jobs and the economy than people who voted in previous Democratic contests.

Income inequality, though, is less of a worry in South Carolina than it has been elsewhere. That issue is the centerpiece of Bernie Sanders' campaign against Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination.

Voters receive assistance from poll workers during the U.S. Democratic presidential primary election in Kershaw, South Carolina, February 27, 2016.Credit: Reuters

Bernie Sanders says he is ready to take on Donald Trump

Bernie Sanders says he is ready to take on Donald Trump.

Speaking Saturday to about 10,000 people at a Formula One racetrack near Austin, Texas, the Vermont senator says he can defeat Trump soundly if he and Trump are the presidential candidates in the fall.

The Democratic presidential contender says Trump is wrong on issues such as the minimum wage, climate change and tax policy.

And Sanders says Americans don't want a president who insults pretty much everyone who's not like him.

Bernie Sanders smiles during a campaign rally at in Austin, Texas, Feb. 27, 2016. Credit: AP

Clinton contrasts foreign policy experience with that of Trump's

Hillary Clinton is contrasting her foreign policy experience with that of Republican front-runner Donald Trump.

Speaking at a university gym in Birmingham, Alabama, on Saturday afternoon, Clinton warns voters that the U.S. president becomes the leader of the free world.

She says, "When you run for president it's not just Americans who pay attention. The entire world listens to every word you say. Markets rise and fall, conflicts go forward or retreat."

She adds: "You do have to be careful about what you say and how you say it."

While Clinton never mentioned Trump by name, the comments were clearly aimed at the billionaire businessman. Clinton says he "spends half his time insulting" much of the world.

Clinton is campaigning in the southern state before the March 1 primary.

Hillary Clinton at a rally at Miles College in Alabama, Feb. 27, 2016.Credit: Reuters

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