As a Boy, He Found God at the Synagogue. Then He Discovered Classical Music

For star Swedish composer Jacob Mühlrad, 'making music is like practicing religion.' Indeed, his works are heavily informed by Jewish themes, Hebrew words and Holocaust trauma

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Mühlrad. “Playing has rules that others have decided on. Composition is different. I’d be in charge of what’s right and wrong.”
Mühlrad. “Playing has rules that others have decided on. Composition is different. I’d be in charge of what’s right and wrong.”
David Stavrou
David Stavrou

STOCKHOLM – Jacob Mühlrad used to be a bad student. A very bad student. Because he suffered from dyslexia, he had difficulty reading and writing, and at school they thought he was unmotivated and lacked proper learning skills. Although he came from a middle-class Jewish family living in an affluent neighborhood in west Stockholm, he was seen as a “problematic” child. A lonely boy, he suffered from panic attacks and depression at the age of 9, disturbed his teachers in the classroom and got into fights in the schoolyard. All that was accompanied by other, physical health problems.

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