Anti-vaxxers and Antisemites: Welcome to Germany's COVID Infection Capital

As pressure in Germany grows to introduce a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, residents of Saxony are grappling with the highest infection rates, the lowest rates of vaccination – and a rise in antisemitism related to the pandemic

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A protester holds up a poster reading "Against Coronazis" during a demonstration against the government's coronavirus curbs, earlier this month in Leipzig, Germany.
A protester holds up a poster reading "Against Coronazis" during a demonstration against the government's coronavirus curbs, earlier this month in Leipzig, Germany. Credit: STRINGER - AFP
Danel Lushi
Danel Lushi
Leipzig, Saxony
Danel Lushi
Danel Lushi
Leipzig, Saxony

LEIPZIG - Frauke and Peter are confused. On Monday, new coronavirus regulations are taking effect in the German state of Saxony, and they aren’t exactly sure what that means for their little book store. It will remain open, but from now on they may have to politely turn away unvaccinated customers.

“In the spring, bookshops were like shops for food. And I hope this will apply to ours also. We don’t know, we don’t know,” Frauke tells Haaretz, in a mixture of English and German.

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