U.S. Continuing With 'Maximum Pressure' Policy on Iran, Treasury Secretary Says

Steve Mnuchin denies report alleging that Trump was considering Emmanuel Macron's $15 billion 'credit line' plan to save the 2015 nuclear agreement

United States Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin holds a news conference after the G7 Finance Ministers Summit in Whistler, British Columbia, Canada, June 2, 2018.
\ BEN NELMS/ REUTERS

WASHINGTON - U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin denied on Thursday a report that the Trump administration was considering giving Iran a $15 billion “credit line” in an attempt to convene a meeting between President Trump and his Iranian counterpart Hassan Rohani.

The United States is still pursuing a campaign of "maximum pressure" against Iran, Mnuchin told CNBC, days after Trump's ousted hard-line national security adviser John Bolton.

The Daily Beast report, which came out on Wednesday night, said Trump was actively considering a French plan to extend a $15 billion credit line to the Iranians if Tehran comes back into compliance with the 2015 nuclear deal. Mnuchin said in reply to a question on the report - “absolutely not.”

>> Read more: Trump decided to fire Bolton after he opposed easing Iran sanctions, report says

Mnuchin did not forcefully deny future plans for a meeting between Trump and Rohani, but said such a meeting is not under plan “as of now."

Earlier this week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also didn’t rule out the possibility of a meeting between the two leaders on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly in New York later this month, and said that Trump will agree to meet Rohani with “no preconditions.”

On Wednesday, Iran said that Tehran will not restart negotiations with the United States while sanctions against Iran remain in place, and that the ousting of Bolton will not make it reconsider its policy.

The United States withdrew from the 2015 nuclear agreement last year and imposed sanctions on Iran with the aim of halting its oil exports and forcing Tehran to negotiate a more sweeping "comprehensive deal."

Reuters contributed to this report.