'You Lost. Decency Won': Twitter Users Go Off on Stephen Miller for Criticizing Biden's Immigration Policy

The former White House adviser and chief architect of many of the Trump administration's controversial immigration policies slammed Biden for 'opening travel from terror hot spots'

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Then-White House policy advisor Stephen Miller arrives aboard Air Force One with Donald Trump for a campaign event at La Crosse Regional Airport in La Crosse, Wisconsin, October 27, 2020.
Then-White House policy advisor Stephen Miller arrives aboard Air Force One with Donald Trump for a campaign event at La Crosse Regional Airport in La Crosse, Wisconsin, October 27, 2020. Credit: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Twitter users went off on former White House adviser Stephen Miller after he attacked U.S. President Joe Biden's immigration plan shortly after his swearing in ceremony on Wednesday 

In his first and currenlty only tweet on his personal page, Miller wrote: “Today, @POTUS pledged to be a president for all Americans. It’s unclear how all Americans are served by opening travel from terror hot spots, proposing a giant amnesty, or halting the installation of security barriers along the Southwest border." 

Miller, an immigration hardliner, was the chief architect of the Trump administration's travel ban, tightening of limits on immigration and the family separation policy at the southern border. He is also listed as an extremist on the Southern Poverty Law Center's Extremist Files. 

“You helped incite a terror attack on Congress and ordered the stealing of babies from their parents,” political journalist Mehdi Hasan wrote in response to Miller’s tweet.

“It turns out the terror hotspots were Trump rallies, so” Asha Rangappa, a lawyer and former FBI agent, tweeted.

In his first official acts as president, Biden signed a series of executives orders on a broad range of issues, from the coronavirus pandemic to climate change and immigration, to fulfill campaign promises.

Biden is ending what is variously known as the “travel ban” or the “Muslim ban,” one of the first acts of the Trump administration. Trump in January 2017 banned foreign nationals from seven mostly Muslim countries from entry into the country. After a lengthy court fight, a watered-down version of the rule was upheld by the Supreme Court in a 5-4 decision in 2018.

The new administration says it will improve the screening of visitors by strengthening information sharing with foreign governments and other measures.

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