Trump Warns Europe and Japan: Trade With Iran and You Won't Trade With U.S.

Trump's top security adviser on Monday urged Iran to take up an offer of talks with the United States or suffer more pain from economic sanctions

President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel during their bilateral meeting, July 11, 2018.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Tuesday the new U.S. sanctions on Iran were "the most biting sanctions ever imposed."

"In November they ratchet up to yet another level. Anyone doing business with Iran will NOT be doing business with the United States. I am asking for WORLD PEACE, nothing less!" he tweeted. 

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Trump's top security adviser on Monday urged Iran to take up an offer of talks with the United States or suffer more pain from economic sanctions, but Iran's president said Washington needed first to prove it can be trusted. Some of the U.S.'s closest allies have signaled they wish to continue trade with Iran, especially when it comes to oil. Energy dependent Japan and Germany both are reluctant to cut business relations with Iran.

Hours before revived U.S. sanctions were due to kick in, White House national security adviser John Bolton said Iran should pay heed to Trump's willingness to negotiate. "They could take up the president's offer to negotiate with them, to give up their ballistic missile and nuclear weapons programs fully and really verifiably," Bolton told Fox News. "If the ayatollahs want to get out from under the squeeze, they should come and sit down. The pressure will not relent while the negotiations go on," said Bolton, one of the administration's main hawks on Iran.

So-called snapback sanctions, due to come into force early on Tuesday, target Iranian purchases of U.S. dollars, metals trading, coal, industrial software and its auto sector. Foes for decades, the United States and Iran have been increasingly at odds over Iran's growing political and military influence in the Middle East since Trump took office in January 2017.

The renewed sanctions were among those lifted under a 2015 deal between world powers and Tehran on curbing Iran's nuclear program. Trump abandoned the deal in May. Heavier U.S. sanctions, aimed at Iran's oil sector, are due in November.

Iran's rial currency has lost half its value since April under the threat of revived U.S. sanctions. The currency's collapse and soaring inflation have sparked sporadic demonstrations in Iran against profiteering and corruption, with many protesters chanting anti-government slogans.