Second Federal Judge Blocks Trump's Newest Travel Ban

Maryland judge says White House failed to show 'that national security cannot be maintained without an unprecedented eight-country travel ban'

Protesters wave signs and chant during a demonstration against U.S. President Donald Trump's revised travel ban outside a federal courthouse in Seattle, May 15, 2017.
Ted S. Warren/AP

A second federal judge blocked U.S. President Donald Trump's latest travel ban on Tuesday, just hours before the policy was set to take effect, The Guardian reported.

U.S. District Judge Theodora Chuang of Maryland said the White House had failed to show "that national security cannot be maintained without an unprecedented eight-country travel ban."

The open-ended ban, announced in September, targeted people from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad and North Korea, as well as certain government officials from Venezuela. It was the latest version of a policy that had previously targeted six Muslim-majority countries but had been restricted by the U.S. Supreme Court. 

U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson in Honolulu, who had blocked an earlier version the ban in March, was the first federal judge to take action against Trump's latest policy on Tuesday. Watson argued in federal court that federal immigration law failed to give Trump the authority to impose the restrictions. 

According to Watson, the latest policy "suffers from precisely the same maladies as its predecessor: it lacks sufficient findings that the entry of more than 150 million nationals from six specified countries would be 'detrimental to the interests of the United States.'"