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Rashida Tlaib Chokes Up While Reading Death Threats She Has Received During Domestic Terrorism Hearing

Democratic congresswoman read aloud death threats her office has received while questioning FBI officials about domestic terrorism

Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., becomes emotional while recounting threats she has received in office because of her Muslim faith, while questioning FBI Assistant Director of the Counterterrorism Division Michael McGarrity during a House Oversight and Reform Civil Rights and Civil Liberties subcommittee hearing on confronting white supremacy and the adequacy of the federal response, Tuesday June 4, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Democratic Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib teared up during a Congressional hearing on Tuesday as she read aloud death threats her office has received while questioning FBI officials about domestic terrorism.

Tlaib was questioning FBI Assistant Director of the Counterterrorism Division Michael McGarrity during a House Oversight and Reform Civil Rights and Civil Liberties subcommittee hearing on confronting white supremacy and the adequacy of the federal response.

Tlaib’s fellow Democrats are calling for federal agencies to step their efforts to combat white supremacy and domestic terrorism: "How is that not enough to fall under domestic terrorism if they're targeting solely based on my faith, and others, and saying that a good Muslim is a dead one?” Asked Tlaib referring to death threats she has received.

The freshman lawmaker, who made history as one of the two first female Muslim women to ever enter Congress, read an excerpt from a threat that praised the New Zealand mosque shooting.

"This is a great start. Let's hope and pray that it continues here in the good old USA. The only good Muslim is a dead one," Tlaib read while choking up.

"What happens? What happens to these individuals?" she asked. "I'm being sincere."

"I'm a mother. I want to go home to my two boys," Tlaib added.

Rep. Tlaib gets emotional while questioning about domestic terrorism (C-SPAN)

McGarrity acknowledged during his questioning by Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez that white supremacy had become an international threat and that the law had not kept up. “The United States Congress doesn’t have a statute for us to use domestic terrorism like we do on foreign terrorists organizations,” he explained.

The Associated Press contributed to this report