Lysol Maker Urges People Not to Inject Disinfectants After Trump Remarks

Trump said researchers should try to apply their findings to coronavirus patients by inserting light or disinfectant into their bodies

Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
U.S. President Donald Trump, 73, responds to a question.
U.S. President Donald Trump, 73, responds to a question.Credit: KEVIN LAMARQUE/ REUTERS

Lysol and Dettol maker Reckitt Benckiser warned people against using disinfectants to treat the coronavirus, after U.S. President Donald Trump suggested researchers try putting disinfectants into patients' bodies.

"Under no circumstance should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body (through injection, ingestion or any other route)," the company said.

Coronavirus tracker: Live statistics of cases and deaths in Israel and around the world >> All our latest stories

Trump said researchers should try to apply their findings to coronavirus patients by inserting light or disinfectant into their bodies.

"Is there a way we can do something like that by injection, inside, or almost a cleaning?" he said. "It would be interesting to check that."

Reckitt said due to recent speculation and social media activity, it had been asked whether internal usage of disinfectants may be appropriate for investigation or use as a treatment for coronavirus. 

Doctors left shocked

Doctors and health experts urged people not to drink or inject disinfectant on Friday after Trump suggested scientists should investigate inserting the cleaning agent into the body as a way to cure COVID-19.

"This is one of the most dangerous and idiotic suggestions made so far in how one might actually treat COVID-19," said Paul Hunter, a professor of medicine at Britain's University of East Anglia. He said infecting disinfectants would be likely to kill anyone who tried it.

"It is hugely irresponsible because, sadly, there are people around the world who might believe this sort of nonsense and try it out for themselves," he told Reuters.

"Neither sitting in the sun, nor heating will kill a virus replicating in an individual patient's internal organs," said Penny Ward, a professor in pharmaceutical medicine at Kings College London and chair of the Education and Standards Committee of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine.

"Drinking bleach kills. Injecting bleach kills faster. Don’t do either!," she added.

Comments