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John Kerry Jokes at Davos, Trump Administration Will Only Last 'A Year, Two Years, Whatever'

In a star studded line up, John Kerry spoke about President Obama's legacy and the Iran deal in particular.

Davos 2017 - A Conversation with John Kerry Diplomacy in an Era of Disruption
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The World Economic Forum 47th Annual Meeting, in Davos: Over 2,500 leaders from business, government, international organisations, civil society, academia, media and the arts will convene under the theme: Responsive and Responsible Leadership.

During the first day of the meeting, delegates heard actor Matt Damon talk about the crippling effects of the lack of clean water on communities around the world, and Donald Trump Senior Advisor Anthony Scaramucci explained the American President-elect's thoughts on Free Trade and discussed the themes of Donald Trump's inauguration speech this coming Friday.

Industry leaders discussed the impact of Artificial Intelligence, and popstar and UNICEF Global Ambassador Shakira argued that you do not need to be a celebrity to effect change.

Outgoing US Secretary of State John Kerry discussed President Obama's legacy, while South Africa's Finance Minister praised the United States Federal Bank for increased sensitivity to developing countries. Mary Barra, Chairman and Chief Executive of General Motors looked ahead to a world where more and more jobs will be done by robots.

John Kerry made headlines in his appearance when asked by Thomas Friedman on stage if he felt President Obama's legacy was in jeopardy. Kerry responded by saying, "We'll have injured our own credibility in, conceivably, an irreparable way. Not irreparably. There's time, and that's just too dramatic. But we will have done great injury to ourselves. And it will hurt for the endurance of a year, two years, whatever, while the [Trump] administration is there."

Full interview World Economic Forum

The theme of the meeting calls on global leaders to renew the systems that have supported international cooperation in the past by adapting them for today's complex, multipolar world in ways that foster genuinely inclusive growth.