GOP Leader to 'Have a Conversation' With QAnon-affiliated Congresswoman After More Posts Surface

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Image from a campaign ad by Marjorie Taylor Greene
Image from a campaign ad by Marjorie Taylor GreeneCredit: Screen shot / YouTube

House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy is facing a renewed challenge in how to approach controversial freshman Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene, who is under fire for newly unearthed comments from 2018 and 2019 in which she indicated support for executing prominent Democrats. 

McCarthy’s spokesman, Mark Bednar, responded to reports of the comments with a statement saying, "These comments are deeply disturbing and Leader McCarthy plans to have a conversation with the Congresswoman about them."

Among the comments in question is a Facebook exchange, first reported by CNN, from April 2018, in which Greene discussed the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and a commenter asked Greene, "Now do we get to hang them ?? Meaning H & O ???" - a reference to former President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Greene, who now represents Georgia's14th congressional district, replied, "Stage is being set. Players are being put in place. We must be patient. This must be done perfectly or liberal judges would let them off."

McCarthy had previously stripped former Republican Congressman Steve King of his committee assignments in 2019 when King sparked fury for comments in which he questioned why “white nationalism” and “white supremacy” had suddenly “become offensive.”

Greene, whose affiliation with the QAnon conspiracy theory has made her a lightning rod for controversy, has also pushed conspiracy theories claiming that 9/11 and the Parkland, Florida school shooting were “false flag” attacks. She has also pushed “a conspiracy theory that Jewish people are trying to take over Europe through immigration,” according to Media Matters.

Newhouse under fire

Most of the Republican county leaders in U.S. Rep. Dan Newhouse’s congressional district on Monday called for the lawmaker to resign for being one of 10 GOP members of the House to vote for the impeachment of former President Donald Trump. Newhouse said he will not resign.

Six county GOP chairs from the 4th Congressional District, which covers the central portion of Washington state, issued a letter Monday calling for Newhouse to resign.

“It is impossible to defend the indefensible,″ said the letter signed by the GOP chairs of Yakima, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Adams and Douglas counties. ”An overwhelming majority of our county constituents are calling for your resignation.″

“When a representative fails to represent the people, the people must respond,″ the letter said, adding many constituents feel “betrayed” by Newhouse’s Jan. 13 vote.

Newhouse said Monday he will remain in the seat he has held since 2015.

“After days of deliberation and prayer, I made a decision to vote based on my oath to support and defend the Constitution,” Newhouse said in a press release. “Many Republicans have agreed with my vote, and many have disagreed. For those who disagree with me on this issue, I hope they will remember my lifelong support for conservative causes and values.”

“I am still a conservative Republican who holds the principles of our Constitution and the priorities of central Washington above all else, and we have a lot of work to do to keep the Biden administration accountable,” Newhouse said.

In justifying his vote, Newhouse has pointed to Trump’s role in inciting the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol and his refusal to calm the situation as a mob swarmed the building.

Newhouse, 65, was reelected with 66% of the vote in November. The conservative district has a large agricultural base and runs from Canada to the Oregon state line.

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