Facebook to Ban Posts Promoting White Nationalism and White Supremacy

'We decided that the overlap between white nationalism, [white] separatism, and white supremacy is so extensive we really can’t make a meaningful distinction between them'

File photo: A woman looks at the Facebook logo on an iPad in this photo illustration taken June 3, 2018.
\ Regis Duvignau/ REUTERS

Facebook Inc announced Wednesday that it will soon ban white nationalist posts from its platform, reported Vice's Motherboard. The new policy will ban statements like, “I am a proud white nationalist” and “Immigration is tearing this country apart; white separatism is the only answer.”

Facebook’s policy director of counterterrorism told Motherboard, “We decided that the overlap between white nationalism, [white] separatism, and white supremacy is so extensive we really can’t make a meaningful distinction between them.” The ban reportedly goes into effect next week.

The announcement comes less than two weeks after Facebook was heavily criticized for its role in the Christchurch mosque attack - which was briefly live streamed on Facebook.

Facebook Inc said on Tuesday it has removed more accounts from Iran, Russia, Macedonia and Kosovo, citing what it described as "coordinated inauthentic behavior."

A total of 2,632 pages, groups, and accounts were removed from Facebook and Instagram for operations linked to the above mentioned countries, the social media platform said.

513 of those accounts were tied to Iran, while 1,907 were linked to Russia, Facebook said.

The accounts tied to Russia were largely removed for spam with a small portion of those engaging in coordinated inauthentic behavior, according to the statement.

Facebook also said the pages and accounts were removed for their behavior and not content.

The social media platform has recently been cracking down on such accounts in many countries after coming under fire in the last two years for its self-admitted sluggishness in developing tools to combat extremist content and propaganda operations.

The company had also removed certain accounts tied to Iran earlier in January.