Delta Sued Over 'Intentional Discrimination' Against Jews and Israelis

The four plaintiffs, longtime employees of the airline, cite a managerial 'assumption that ethnic Jews and Israelis ... cannot be trusted, are aggressive and inappropriate, and engage in what are deemed to be 'strange' behaviors'

A Boeing Co. 747-400 airplane operated by Delta Airlines Inc. taxis at Paine Field in Everett, Washington on December 18, 2017.
Bloomberg

Delta Air Lines Inc. on Tuesday was hit with a lawsuit by current and former New York-based flight attendants who say managers discriminated against them because they are Jewish or Israeli.

The four plaintiffs in the lawsuit filed in federal court in Brooklyn say they were harassed, denied promotions, or unfairly disciplined because of their religion or nationality. Delta managers, they said, “operate under an express assumption that ethnic Jews and Israelis ... cannot be trusted, are aggressive and inappropriate, and engage in what are deemed to be ‘strange’ behaviors by conducting prayers on the flight and requiring special dietary accommodations.”

First reported by TMZ, the suit was filed by long-time employees for what they call "a pattern of intentionally discriminating and retaliating against ethnically Jewish, Hebrew and/or Israeli employees and passengers" specifically on the flight route from New York City to Tel Aviv. 

Among the allegations is one claiming Delta fired a flight attendent in March 2017 because she is Jewish, and tried to blame instead her absence on a flight - though she was granted leave for a medical emergency. 

The plaintiffs also allege that work benefits of one Delta employee were plainly revoked because she shared her "Travel Companion" pass with a Jewish friend, noting that other attendents had been passed up for promotions and were subject to a "hostile" and "intimidating environment."