Breitbart Writer Exposed as Admin of White Supremacist Facebook Group

Jack Hadfield, who writes for the site run by Steve Bannon, is behind a group that serves as a platform for fascists and white supremacists, report says

Jack Hadfield is seen in a screenshot of his Facebook account.
Screenshot / Facebook

A writer for Breitbart, the far-right news website run by former White House chief counsel Steve Bannon, has been exposed as the administrator of a far-right Facebook group featuring "virulently racist, sexist, and anti-Semitic content," the progressive news website ThinkProgress reported on Monday.

According to the report, the British anti-fascism charity Hope Not Hate discovered that Jack Hadfield, a third-year political science student in Britain, is behind the hidden group Young Right Society.

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The page, which has some 200 members, describes itself as "a place for those who are on the Right to discuss politics, philosophy, and general Right-wing stuff with as little censorship or government intervention as possible."

But Hope Not Hate has discovered that the group also serves as a platform for fascists and white supremacists, with some members expressing support for a neo-Nazi group the British government classified as a terror organization.

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"Jo Cox was a virtue signalling, more-progressive-than-thou cunt and we do not owe her respect just because she was killed," wrote one member in a reference to the Labour MP who was murdered by a neo-Nazi.

Another post proposes a cover photo for the group featuring a swastika and men dressed up as Nazis.

Hadfield defended his failure to delete especially hateful posts, saying in a statement, "that's what free speech is.

"This smear campaign run by Hope not Hate is just another example of the left attempting to shut down free discussion, a worrying insight into the future of so-called 'liberals' in this country," said Hadfield, who has written over 150 articles for Breitbart. 

Breitbart News, which is edited by Steve Bannon, is popular with the "alt-right," a loose grouping characterized by a rejection of mainstream politics that includes neo-Nazis and anti-Semites.

Bannon left the news website prior to joining U.S. President Donald Trump's 2016 presidental campaign, but returned to work for Breitbart just hours after Trump fired him in August.