WATCH

Alec Baldwin Says Trump Impressions May End Soon, President Lacks 'Sportsmanship'

'Trump just overwhelmingly lacks any kind of sportsmanship. He remains bitter and angry. And you just want to look at him and go, ‘You won!’' the actor said in a recent interview.

 Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump gives a KKK member a smooch during a Saturday Night Live sketch.
Screen grab

Alec Baldwin may soon end his wildly popular "Saturday Night Live" impersonations of Donald Trump, the actor says. Baldwin began impersonating then candidate Trump last October, after which the late-night sketch comedy experienced some of its highest ratings in a decade. However, in conversation with Extra's Mario Lopez, Balwin explained that he is ready to bow out due to Trump's lack of "sportsmanship" and his "maliciousness."

“His policies aside, which you can hate, I thought he would have just relaxed,” Baldwin said. “The maliciousness of this White House has people worried, which is why I’m not going to do it much longer, the impersonation. I don’t know how much more people can take it," apparently referencing Trump's angry tweets regarding the Baldwin and SNL.

“Trump just overwhelmingly lacks any kind of sportsmanship. He remains bitter and angry. And you just want to look at him and go, ‘You won!’” Baldwin said.

The actor also poured cold water on the idea being touted, that he host the White House Correspondents Dinner in the place of Trump, who is breaking with tradition and boycotting the dinner due, he said, to the press coverage of him.

Alec Baldwin Might Not Play Trump on SNL Much Longer Extra

“If Trump himself doesn’t come and face the music, as it were, I don’t know what kind of program they’re going to have. If they wanted me to do it, I would probably do it,” Baldwin said. “But I’m not quite sure they’ll do. I think they may have a whole other idea.”

Baldwin also said his impersonation of U.S. President Donald Trump on NBC's sketch show "Saturday Night Live" has revived his "dead" comedy career after he wrapped up sitcom "30 Rock" in 2012. "I didn't realize in the comedy terms that I was dead," Baldwin told Reuters on Monday when asked if he felt he was entering a new era with his comedy.