U.S. Freezes Russian Banks Over Ukraine Invasion; Biden: Sanctions on Putin 'On the Table'

Biden announces new export control measures that could halt half of high-tech imports into Russia, and also said his administration would limit Russia's ability to do business in dollars as well as other currencies

Reuters
Haaretz
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
A woman at a protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in Jerusalem, Monday.
A woman at a protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in Jerusalem, Monday.Credit: Maya Alleruzzo /AP
Reuters
Haaretz

U.S. President Joe Biden announced sanctions on four major Russian banks on Thursday, which he said hold $1 trillion in assets. "This aggression cannot go unanswered," he said of the country's invasion of Ukraine.

Biden announced new export control measures that could halt half of high-tech imports into Russia, and also said his administration would limit Russia's ability to do business in dollars as well as other currencies, and planned to sanction additional Russian banks including VTB.

At this point, the sanctions on Russia do not include banning the country from the SWIFT banking system.

The option of sanctioning Russian President Vladimir Putin personally over Russia's invasion of Ukraine remained a possibility, Biden said. "It's not a bluff, it's on the table."

He did not reply to a question about why such personal sanctions targeting Putin were not included in a coordinated set of sanctions announced on Thursday.

As part of the United States' commitment to NATO, he said, the country will be stationing more troops in Germany, but clarified: "Our forces will not be engaged in conflict with Russia in Ukraine."

After weeks of denying plans to invade, Putin justified his actions in an overnight televised address, asserting that the attack was needed to protect civilians in eastern Ukraine – a false claim the United States had predicted he would make as a pretext for an invasion.

Russia launched an all-out invasion of Ukraine by land, air and sea on Thursday, the biggest attack by one state against another in Europe since World War II.

President Joe Biden speaks about the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the East Room of the White House, Thursday.Credit: Alex Brandon /AP

Click the alert icon to follow topics:

Comments

SUBSCRIBERS JOIN THE CONVERSATION FASTER

Automatic approval of subscriber comments.
From $1 for the first month

SUBSCRIBE
Already signed up? LOG IN

ICYMI

Charles Lindbergh addressing an America First Committee rally on October 3, 1941.

Ken Burns’ Brilliant ‘The U.S. and the Holocaust’ Has Only One Problem

The projected rise in sea level on a beach in Haifa over the next 30 years.

Facing Rapid Rise in Sea Levels, Israel Could Lose Large Parts of Its Coastline by 2050

Prime Minister Yair Lapid, this month.

Lapid to Haaretz: ‘I Have Learned to Respect the Left’

“Dubi,” whose full name is secret in keeping with instructions from the Mossad.

The Mossad’s Fateful 48 Hours Before the Yom Kippur War

Tal Dilian.

As Israel Reins in Its Cyberarms Industry, an Ex-intel Officer Is Building a New Empire

Queen Elizabeth II, King Charles III and a British synagogue.

How the Queen’s Death Changes British Jewry’s Most Distinctive Prayer