Republican Official Deletes Comment Suggesting Trump’s Trial Was Less Fair Than Nazi Show Trials

After criticism, Virginia RNC member Patricia Bast Lyman apologizes, saying she was misunderstood

JTA
Ben Sales
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Donald Trump holds a phone call at the White House in Washington in October.
Donald Trump holds a phone call at the White House in Washington in October. Credit: Leah Millis/Reuters
JTA
Ben Sales

A member of the Republican National Committee from Virginia has deleted a Facebook comment apparently suggesting that Nazi show trials were fairer than the recent Senate trial of former President Donald Trump.

A top Republican Jewish leader called the comment “outrageous and indefensible” before Patricia Bast Lyman, the Republican committeewoman, apologized and said she had been misinterpreted.

Lyman was commenting on a Facebook post from another Virginia Republican official, Steve Knotts, which appears to also have been deleted. In her comment, Lyman wrote, “At least some of those tried by the Nazis may have been actual criminals, unlike the current debacle.”

In the show trials, Nazi prosecutors tried people accused of political offenses; virtually all were convicted, most receiving death sentences. The Senate on Saturday acquitted Trump in his impeachment trial.

Denver Riggleman, a former Republican congressman from Virginia who has been an outspoken critic of antisemitism, called out the comment as “virulently antisemitic.” (In his Twitter thread, Riggleman initially mistook the comment to be about the Nuremberg Trials, in which Nazis were the defendants, not the prosecutors, before correcting himself.)

So did the Teenage Republican Federation of Virginia, which wrote that it was “disheartened and disgusted” by the comment, adding, “There is no place for anti-Semitism, racism, or bigotry in the #GOP.”

And Republican Jewish Coalition Executive Director Matt Brooks also condemned the comment, tweeting that the comment was “outrageous and indefensible.” He then tweeted that he reached out to Lyman and she “was very apologetic, contrite and genuinely upset by the impression her comments caused.”

After deleting the comment, Lyman wrote on Facebook that she has “always stood unequivocally with Israel and the Jewish people, and I’ve been privileged to spend nearly 20 years representing those fleeing persecution for their faith around the world.”

“I am horrified that my comment would be seen as diminishing the memory of those millions who perished solely because they were Jewish,” she wrote. “That is not in my heart, has never been and never will be. I am truly sorry that anyone for a moment believed there was any ill-intent on my part.”

The Jewish Telegraphic Agency has also sent a message to Knotts seeking comment.

Click the alert icon to follow topics:

Comments

SUBSCRIBERS JOIN THE CONVERSATION FASTER

Automatic approval of subscriber comments.
From $1 for the first month

SUBSCRIBE
Already signed up? LOG IN

ICYMI

Charles Lindbergh addressing an America First Committee rally on October 3, 1941.

Ken Burns’ Brilliant ‘The U.S. and the Holocaust’ Has Only One Problem

The projected rise in sea level on a beach in Haifa over the next 30 years.

Facing Rapid Rise in Sea Levels, Israel Could Lose Large Parts of Its Coastline by 2050

Prime Minister Yair Lapid, this month.

Lapid to Haaretz: ‘I Have Learned to Respect the Left’

“Dubi,” whose full name is secret in keeping with instructions from the Mossad.

The Mossad’s Fateful 48 Hours Before the Yom Kippur War

Tal Dilian.

As Israel Reins in Its Cyberarms Industry, an Ex-intel Officer Is Building a New Empire

Queen Elizabeth II, King Charles III and a British synagogue.

How the Queen’s Death Changes British Jewry’s Most Distinctive Prayer