White House Opens Probe After Reports That Ivanka, Jared Used Private Email Accounts

Politico reported that senior aides and other White House officials had used private email accounts to exchange messages for government business

Ivanka Trump talks with husband and fellow senior adviser Jared Kushner prior to a moment of silence in remembrance of 9/11, Washington, U.S., September 11, 2017.
Ivanka Trump talks with husband and fellow senior adviser Jared Kushner prior to a moment of silence in remembrance of 9/11, Washington, U.S., September 11, 2017. KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS

The White House has launched an internal investigation into the use of private email by senior aides, pulling batches of emails on the White House server to and from their private accounts, Politico reported on Thursday. 

Citing four unnamed officials, Politico said the effort began this week after it reported that President Donald Trump's son-in-law and adviser, Jared Kushner, and other senior White House officials had used private email accounts to exchange messages for government business. 

A U.S. House of Representatives committee asked the White House on Monday for information about the report. 

According to Politico, the emails included correspondence about media coverage, event planning and other subjects. Kushner's lawyer, Abbe Lowell, said Kushner complied with government record-keeping rules by forwarding all the emails to his official account.

The New York Times reported that Trump's daughter and adviser Ivanka Trump, aides Gary Cohn and Stephen Miller and former staff members Steve Bannon and Reince Priebus also used private accounts.

Hillary Clinton was quick to blast Kushner saying on Sirius XM radio Monday, that the revelations show “the hypocrisy of this administration, who knew there was no real scandal, who knew that there was no basis for all their hyperventilating. Republican members of Congress who politicized the deaths in Benghazi."

During Trump's 2016 election campaign, the Republican derided Democratic rival Hillary Clinton for her use of a private email server for official correspondence when she was secretary of state under former President Barack Obama. Some of those messages were later determined to contain classified information.

Trump often led crowds in chants of "Lock her up!" during the campaign and vowed in October she would "be in jail" over the matter if he became president. He has since said he would not pursue prosecution.