1 in 4 American Jews Has Experienced Antisemitism Since 2016, ADL Finds

Ben Sales
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Demonstrators rally on the steps of the New York Public Library against the closure of some Jewish schools and businesses due to COVID in Queens and Brooklyn.
Demonstrators rally on the steps of the New York Public Library against the closure of some Jewish schools and businesses due to COVID in Queens and Brooklyn.Credit: John Lamparski/Sipa USA via Reuters
Ben Sales

An annual survey from the Anti-Defamation League found that a quarter of American Jews have personally experienced antisemitism in the past five years, and that most American Jews have witnessed antisemitic comments targeting others.

In that same time period, 9 percent of Jewish respondents said they have been the victim of an antisemitic physical attack.

In total, 63 percent of Jewish respondents reported that they had either witnessed or experienced antisemitism in the years since 2016, an increase from 54 percent last year. The survey was taken in early January and includes responses from 503 Jewish-American adults. The margin of error is 4.4 percent.

The proportion of Jews who said they have experienced antisemitism or been the victim of a physical attack are slightly higher than they were last year but are within the margin of error. Last year, 20 percent of Jews said they had experienced antisemitism over the past five years, while 5 percent reported being the victim of a physical attack.

In addition, 40 percent of respondents said they heard antisemitic comments directed at someone else over the past year. Some 59 percent of respondents said they feel Jews are less safe in the United States than they were a decade ago, similar to the figure from last year’s survey.

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