Thousands of Witches Cast Spells to Oust Trump. And They Say It's Working

Sisters and brothers in the Magic Resistance don’t want to harm the president, just prevent him from harming others. Witches want health care, too.

NEW YORK Witches, pagans and wiccans banded together this week to cast a spell on Donald Trump, aiming to prove that the U.S. president’s woes in deflecting his Russia problems, replacing Obamacare and other missteps are witch’s work.

The Magic Resistance has been on the job for two months, hoping it can oust the 45th president. There are more than 1,700 members in the Facebook group Bind Trump, where resistance members share their savvy on spells.

Newcomers to the occult often ask for guidance, and Michael Hughes, the group’s creator, has released a document with instructions for the magic spell. The key ingredients: an unflattering picture of Trump, the Tower tarot card and a small orange candle (or carrot).

On set dates, the witches summon these four elements to “bind Trump”  and ultimately get him out of the White House.

“I call upon you to bind Donald J. Trump so that his malignant works may fail utterly, that he may do no harm to any human soul nor any tree, animal, rock, stream or sea,” the spell begins. “Bind him so that he shall not break our polity, usurp our liberty or fill our minds with hate, confusion, fear or despair. And bind, too, all those who enable his wickedness.”

Then the witch burns the photo while chanting “So mote it be!” or, for those who can’t resist a certain catchphrase: “You’re fired!”

The instructions were created by Michael Hughes, 51, a writer from Baltimore who runs the Facebook group. He estimates that thousands took part in the  ritual at midnight last Sunday and says he’s in touch with kindred spirits from across the United States and around the world.

“The idea of some kind of magical resistance has been brewing in a number of circles of occultists and magicians, and we all put together the document,” he told Haaretz. “None of us had any idea it would become a global viral sensation.”

Hughes says wiccans adherents of pagan witchcraft magicians and even people new to the occult took part in the rituals, yet the group has also drawn criticism.

“I expected backlash from evangelical communities, and that has certainly happened. I didn’t expect criticism from the occult and pagan community. But just like other religions have their dogma, pagans and wiccans have their dogma,” Hughes says.

“The main criticism was from people seeing it as a negative spell. Wiccans believe in something called the Three-fold Law if you put a negative spell into the world, it comes back to you three times stronger. But we explained that it’s a binding spell, and I believe what we’re doing is a positive thing.”

In the hours leading up to this week’s mass ritual, the witches posted pictures of their homemade alters and shared their experiences during and after the spell. Most agreed that the magic felt much stronger this time.

During the previous spell, a small group gathered in front of Trump Tower in New York, and this week a small event was held in Baltimore, but most witches prefer to cast their spell in the privacy of their own home.

Ashlee Staub, a 31-year-old teacher from Seattle, says she appreciates the home-spell option. “I’m not some big pagan wiccan, but I was drawn to the community,” she says. “It’s awesome, it’s only doing good; it’s not harming anybody.”

The witches stress that the spell isn’t meant to harm Trump, only to prevent him from harming others.

“My heart has always been in protection of my children,” Staub says. “I look at the ripple effects of these policies on my children, so in my mind the protection is not only for my parents, who are going to lose their health care, or myself and my partner, who will be challenged paying high taxes because we’re not rich, but for our kids and the next generation.”

After the first spell, the witches have kept one eye on their sorcery and the other on the headlines, as, for example, Obamacare remains the law and it becomes clear that increasing numbers of administration officials have had questionable ties with Russia.

“Magic is more an art than a science, so it’s hard to quantify,” says Hughes of the spell’s effects. “I see the administration being stifled in their attempts to see their agenda pass. So one way or another, our goal is being realized.”

Staub says she doesn’t want to attribute the administration’s stumbles solely to the spells, but she shares the optimism of others in the group. “I’m seeing this working along with other things like the protests at the airports. It all helps,” she says. “This is one of the many parts of what’s working.”