U.S. Jews Are Most Pro-vaccine Religious Group in America, Poll Finds

Ben Samuels
Ben Samuels
Washington
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A health care worker fills a syringe with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine in New York, last month.
A health care worker fills a syringe with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine in New York, last month. Credit: Mary Altaffer / AP Photo
Ben Samuels
Ben Samuels
Washington

WASHINGTON – Jewish Americans are the most likely religious group to accept the COVID-19 vaccine, according to a poll by the Public Religion Research Institute and Interfaith Youth Core.

The poll, conducted in June 2021, found that 85 percent of Jewish Americans are likely to be vaccine acceptors. However, while all other religious groups surveyed saw at least a 10-point growth in likelihood of acceptance rates since March, the rate among Jews has generally stayed the same. 

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Eight percent of American Jews reported vaccine hesitancy, down from 10 percent in March, while seven percent are refusers, marking a two-percent increase from the March findings.

"With the exception of Jewish Americans (28%), majorities or a plurality of Americans of all major religious groups report at least moderate concerns about COVID-19 vaccines," the report reads.

Twelve percent of Jewish Americans are also the least likely to look to religious leaders for information on vaccines, tied for the least likely of religious groups surveyed. The survey added that "with the exception of Jewish Americans and Mormons, every other religious group is notably less likely to turn today to religious leaders for information than they were in March,"

Seventy-one percent of U.S. Jews support requiring proof of vaccines for activities like travel, work or school — among the highest of religious groups surveyed. Meanwhile, only 46 percent of American Jews support allowing individuals to refuse a COVID vaccine if it would violate their religious beliefs and 29 percent of Jewish Americans support religiously motivated vaccine refusals for children in public schools.

The survey was designed and conducted by PRRI and IFYC among a random sample of 5,123 adults (ages 18 and up) living in all 50 states and who are part of Ipsos’s Knowledge Panel, as well as an additional 382 adults who were recruited by Ipsos using opt-in survey panels to increase the sample sizes in smaller states.

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