Sheldon Adelson's Closest Israeli Adviser Resigns Amid Falling Out, Source Says

Dan Raviv has worked for Adelson and his wife for 16 years.

Las Vegas Sands Corp. Chairman and CEO Sheldon Adelson testifies at Clark County Justice Center on Tuesday, April 28, 2015, in Las Vegas.
AP

Sheldon Adelson’s close adviser, Dan Raviv, recently resigned after many years of service to the American billionaire both in Israel and abroad. The reasons the Israeli considered closest to Adelson will no longer be working with him are not clear, but a source who knows both men told Haaretz that they had a falling out.

Adelson, who owns casinos in the United States and Macao, is the publisher of the Israel Hayom newspaper and a prominent donor to the Republican Party, would not respond to questions on the matter. Raviv confirmed that he is no longer working for Adelson but refused to elaborate, only saying, “[I] respect and love Mr. Adelson. I resigned to pursue my own independent course after many years of fruitful, satisfying and unforgettable work with him.”

Raviv had worked with Sheldon Adelson and his wife Miriam since 2000. Prior to that, he spent decades as a journalist at the Israel Broadcasting Authority. It was Miriam who brought him into Adelson’s organization after he left the IBA.

He began working as Adelson's spokesman, but his job expanded substantially. Over the years, he was involved in various aspects of Adelson’s economic empire, from dealing with marketing and hospitality for Adelson’s hotel and casinos to liaising with the Israeli nonprofit organizations linked to the Adelson family.

According to a 2015 article in the Hebrew-language magazine Liberal, Raviv was involved behind the scenes in Israel Hayom, which is known for its unreserved support of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. According to Liberal, it was Raviv who suggested that Amos Regev be appointed editor of the free daily.

Raviv is apparently very wealthy in his own right. Three years ago it was reported that he had bought a penthouse apartment in Ramat Aviv for 18.5 million shekels ($4.8 million at the current exchange rate).