Congressional Candidate Who Supports Antisemitic QAnon Conspiracy Theory Backed by GOP

Marjorie Taylor Greene, who is vying for a seat in the House of Representatives, has also shared a theory that ‘Zionist supremacists’ are conspiring to flood Europe with migrants to replace the white population

Allison Kaplan Sommer
Allison Kaplan Sommer
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Republican U.S. House candidate Marjorie Taylor Greene speaks at a news conference in Dallas, Georgia, U.S. October 15, 2020.
Allison Kaplan Sommer
Allison Kaplan Sommer

The Republican Party is officially supporting Marjorie Taylor Greene, a candidate for the House of Representatives from Georgia, who has espoused the antisemitic QAnon conspiracy theory and employed racist rhetoric before and during her congressional campaign.

According to campaign finance records, the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) donated $5,000 to Greene’s congressional campaign on September 25, the Daily Beast reported.

On her Facebook page, Greene has expressed support for the unsubstantiated QAnon conspiracy theory, which employs multiple antisemitic tropes. It alleges that U.S. President Donald Trump is at war with a cabal of Satan-worshipping international elites, in league with the “deep state,” the Democratic Party and the media.

This nefarious group, the theory posits, is behind a murderous international child-trafficking ring that aspires to control the U.S. government. Adherents believe that messages are relayed to followers by “Q,” a pseudonym for a supposed government insider who posts updates to the internet.

In addition to promoting QAnon, Taylor has used her platforms to advance an antisemitic conspiracy theory that Jewish billionaire investor and philanthropist George Soros, who is Jewish, collaborated with the Nazis.

She also shared a video on Facebook repeating the “Great Replacement” theory, which asserts that “Zionist supremacists” are conspiring to flood Europe with African, Asian and Latino migrants in order to replace whites, calling it “the biggest genocide in human history.” The video also said that Muslim refugees are “flooding” Europe with the intention of instituting traditional Islamic law. “This is what the UN wants all over the world,” Greene wrote on Facebook.

Videos of Greene making racist remarks targeting Muslims, Black people, Jews and others first surfaced in June. At the time, NRCC spokesman Chris Pack said that the group’s chairman, Rep. Tom Emmer of Minnesota, was “personally disgusted by this rhetoric and condemns it in the strongest possible terms.”

Along with the NRCC, top Republican leaders distanced themselves from Greene after the videos came to light. House Minority Whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana called Greene’s comments “disgusting” and Rep. Jody Hice of Georgia said they were “appalling and deeply troubling.”

Greene has, however, won praise from Trump. After she won her Republican primary in mid-August in spite of her QAnon affiliation, Trump tweeted: “Congratulations to future Republican Star Marjorie Taylor Greene on a big Congressional primary win in Georgia against a very tough and smart opponent. Marjorie is strong on everything and never gives up – a real WINNER!”

Greene, a construction executive, is expected to win the congressional seat in her highly conservative district. In August, she won 57 percent of the vote in Georgia’s 14th Congressional District, easily defeating her rival, John Cowan.

After her primary victory, Greene attempted to walk back her support for QAnon, claiming that the media was “misrepresenting her.” 

She told Fox News that “there was a time there for a while that I had read about Q, posted about it, talked about it, which is some of these videos you’ve seen come out. But once I started finding misinformation, I decided that I would choose another path.”

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