Israelis, Ditch the 'Moderate' Politicians - Vote for Extremism!

The only ones offering real solutions for Israel’s ills are extremists on the right and left.

Amos Biderman

The moderate voter is considering who to vote for in next March’s election. All he has asked for is a little security, a little quiet, a good salary and, above all, a Jewish state – the kind that will benefit the Jews. We deserve it after all we’ve been through, and so does he.

There is a wide selection of electoral lists promising him just this: center-left, center-right, Lapid and Kahlon, Herzog and Livni; and Likud is also a moderate party, relatively speaking.

He does not believe any of them, but he will vote for one of them. After all, he is a moderate, and he will cast a vote for moderation.

He doesn’t like the extremist parties or radical solutions. In general, he hates extremism; he didn’t ask for that much.

The moderate voter wants peace; he absolutely wants peace. But not now, and certainly not by dividing Jerusalem and having rockets fall on Ben-Gurion International Airport.

And besides, who is there to make peace with? Hamas? Holocaust deniers? There is no partner.

He never visited the territories, not including Highway 443 and that bar mitzvah at the Western Wall. What business does he have there? And anyway, they told him it is dangerous out there.

He sees the settlers as extremists. He doesn’t like extremists, and he’s barely met any his entire life.

Since serving in the army, he has not met Palestinians either, except for the guy who floored his kitchen – and he has no idea if that guy was a Palestinian, from East Jerusalem or perhaps even a Circassian Israeli.

There is no touching the Israel Defense Forces. There’s nothing to discuss, neither its budget nor the behavior of its soldiers. It is the most moral army in the world, and it guarantees security.

The moderate voter wants quiet. He can’t deal with another intifada or the headache of evacuating settlers. He also does not want African migrants – let them go somewhere else, because Israel can’t absorb them with all its so-called existential problems.

He is also sick of the Supreme Court. The truth is, he isn’t so interested in politics. All these laws – nation-state, infiltration, Nakba and Israel Hayom – went over his head. There’s too much democracy, that’s for sure. He didn’t ask for that much.

Most of the parties pledge to fulfill his wishes. A little bit of peace process; perhaps a handful of “painful compromises”; security, of course, and extinguishing terror; as well as continuing mass detentions in Holot and improving relations with America – moderation.

Of course, he won’t vote for Avigdor Lieberman (Yisrael Beiteinu) or Naftali Bennett (Habayit Hayehudi) – they are extremists.

He probably won’t vote for Meretz, which is borderline extremist, and certainly not for the Zoabis, who are traitors.

The moderate voter will eventually find someone situated between the left and right.

But the truth is, the moderate voter is extreme like nothing else. He is convincing himself of his own lies, and the moderate parties for which he votes, again and again, lead him to denial.

The moderate voter is an extremist, because his votes make possible the extremist policy of the moderate parties: Continuous military occupation, among the most brutal on Earth; an offensive war by Israel every two to three years, causing death and destruction of horrifying dimensions; outlandish military budgets that hinder welfare and spawn violent tyranny over another people.

This is what the moderates in Israel do, not the extremists, and the moderate voter is a full partner.

His coconspirators in the lie, the moderate parties, don’t offer any solution – just worn-out clichés that they don’t seriously believe. There are no moderate solutions to an extreme situation. The only ones offering real solutions are the extremists on the right and the left.

And what do the moderates offer? To leap into the abyss with gentle, measured dialogues? One step forward and two steps back? There is no such thing.

Yes, it’s nicer to feel moderate, but the election is taking place in a situation of such extreme matters that there are only two options: Either a radical solution, or continuing a life of denial and lies until destruction. Just don’t call it moderation.