Careful America, No One Wants a Netanyahu 2020 Presidential Campaign

If Cruz can do it, Netanyahu can as well. Reclaiming his American citizenship could put Israel's prime minister in a position to deliver devastation to the U.S. as well.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu leaves the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 9, 2015.
AP

In the Republic primary today in Iowa, one of the leading candidates is Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, who is challenged by a legal controversy over whether he is qualified to serve as president of the United States because he was born in Canada, the son of a mother who was an American citizen.

The U.S. Constitution states that the president must be a “natural born Citizen,” an awkward term but certainly understood by those who wrote the Constitution, because in the original there is a clear link between nature and citizenship.

In Cruz’s case, the challenge to his right to citizenship is dual: The place of his birth and the identity of the parent who passes on their citizenship to the child. So far it was accepted, in the spirit of discrimination customary until recently, that citizenship passed on only through the father. In practice, they weren’t fussy about this’ even though the White House is hanging in the balance; an appeal of this rule will also be heard, which can be easily changed.

It is harder, though, to convince the conservative majority in the Supreme Court – and after all it is actually the Republicans who are devoted in their demands for strict constructionism – that the intention of the founding fathers was to also allow those born outside the country, those who are not immigrants but the children of Americans, to be elected president.

The fall of this constitutional barrier will rip open the blackened skies because what is decided concerning Eleanor Cruz will also apply to Tzila Netanyahu, an American citizen (as opposed to her husband Benzion, the family says) when her son Benjamin was born. If Ted – Rafael Edward – plants his stake, then Benjamin can do so too.

Netanyahu has given up his American citizenship twice, the first time when he was drafted into the IDF in 1967, according to American regulations in force at the time. When he was released from the army he renewed his citizenship, but once again gave it up when he was appointed deputy chief of mission at the Israeli Embassy in Washington in 1982.

If he asks, he will once again get his citizenship back, it will be as easy as a third marriage for him, and on the wings of Sheldon Adelson’s money he will fly to the Republican candidacy in the 2020 elections, because it is the Americans’ turn to suffer.

In the second half of 2019 Netanyahu will pass David Ben-Gurion on the list of the longest serving prime ministers, with over 13 years in office; he will reach 70; and the other presidential alternative, in Jerusalem, will open up only two years later. It will be the right time to pick up and leave Israel to his real homeland, the land of his consciousness, language and dreams.

But Israel cannot allow itself to wait three more bloody years. His life and work environment are hollow and sick, monstrous in their utilitarian alienation that characterizes the attitude of the Netanyahus to the world. The numbers of those hurt by him and those who survived him are growing, and their testimony is hair-raising. A little bit of this, a touch of the horrible reality, came out in the lawsuit of Meni Naftali against Netanyahu – who evaded providing an affidavit and testimony – and against the Prime Minister’s Office and Ezra Saidoff.

Netanyahu’s heart is callous not just to people, but also in security. Last summer it was reported to him that the Israeli ambassador in an important capital in Europe was caught in suspicious behavior towards minors, and the local security services were aware of this. After Netanyahu was convinced to return home the person who could be blackmailed and not to extend his tenure, he wanted to appoint him to a central, very sensitive post in the management of the Foreign Ministry. So Netanyahu invites to the meetings of the security cabinet and exposes the deepest secrets to the representative of a foreign country: the honorary consul of Austria, Isaac Molho, whose law firm also deals with the affairs of the American consulate.

Everyone cooperates with this anarchy. The attorney general has agreed to it, and the head of the Shin Bet is silent, as is his custom. Similarly there are the customs authorities who know that the Netanyahu entourage bypasses them in transferring their luggage, filled with all the finest, from the planes directly to the cars.

The rot is growing, and the investigations are rising higher. With the courtesy of the faithful police commissioner, Roni Alsheich, Netanyahu is fighting a holding strategy: a gag order on the police’s investigation reports. Neither organized crime nor petty thieves worry them; only public figures questioned as suspects, they and their wives.