There Is No Place for Jews in Europe

Jews have always been murdered in Europe. The difference between the past and the present is that the murderers are now Muslim rather than Christian.

Reuters

The declarations of French Prime Minister Manuel Valls that “We haven’t done enough against the new anti-Semitism” and “Without the Jews, France is no longer France” are indeed touching. So is his appeal to “Stay with us, we’ll fight terror.” But the main problem facing French Jews, and indeed all of Europe, is not terror. France can deal with terror. Terror acts will continue, but that is not what will endanger the republic. After every attack, the state will develop antibodies and become stronger, as it did this week in the impressive and unprecedented rally that was followed by a special session of the French parliament.

The main problem of the Jews of France, and to a greater degree France’s “veteran” Christian population, is the Muslims who are bent on changing the character, the culture and the secular-democratic way of life of France and of Europe as a whole. For these Muslims, each terror attack only defers the inevitable unfolding of this unstoppable process.

Since the natural increase rate of France’s “original” residents is negligible while that of its Muslim population is high and Muslim immigration continues, no terror will be needed to effect a takeover from within when the time comes.

Until a few decades ago, immigrants to France sought to assimilate into the majority: language, culture and way of life. Not anymore. The Muslim immigrants reject all cultural integration and proudly, even defiantly, champion an Islamic alternative. Whatever its reasons, French society allows this alternative entity to expand.

It will not be on account of the departure of the Jews that France will no longer be France. France won’t be France because its energies are spent and it no longer wants to be France — Valls knows why. That is how the state, unable to stop the process, reached its current situation.

There are already two societies within France. The first, the overwhelming majority, the Christian-democratic, is shrinking, while the Muslim minority is growing and taking over. And the Jews? They are a dwindling minority, caught in between. The Muslims can’t stand them and the Christians can’t save them. (The “old” anti-Semitism is still alive and well.) Valls and President Francois Hollande say the right words but they do not take the right actions that would nip this process in the bud.

It would of course be better were French Jews to immigrate to Israel out of Zionism rather than in the wake of terrorism. But history teaches us that this will not happen, even if the sword is at their throats. The Jews of Europe have been through much worse times, and back then there were Jewish leaders such as Ze’ev Jabotinsky who predicted the future and urged the Jews to save themselves. We all know about the answer, and the denial, of the vast majority. Today, most of those leaving France go to Canada, Australia and other places rather than to Israel.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s calls for French Jews to leave the Diaspora and return to their homeland fall on deaf ears. But that was not why his remarks provoked so much criticism and ridicule, particularly (of course) in Israel. (A prominent Haaretz columnist accused him of stabbing France in the back.) The mass attack on Netanyahu recalled, in its agitated tone, the responses to Jabotinsky’s calls of alarm. Then, as now, there are Jews for whom it is uncomfortable to hear the bitter truth: Esau hates Jacob. The “beauty” of Japheth — the son of Noah who is considered the progenitor of the Europeans — was murderous toward the Jews nearly throughout history, including in France. The difference between now and then is that in the past the murderers were Christian; now they are Muslim.