Opinion

Alliance of Deniers

President Reuven Rivlin and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attend a Holocaust Rememberance Day ceremony, Jerusalem, May 2, 2019.
Abir Sultan,AP

Today, as in the 1930s, there are Jews, even in Israel, who deny the Jew-hatred that exists in the world. Back then, this hatred was prominent, mainly, in the European Christian world.

Today it has expanded, crossed seas and continents and taken hold in large parts of the Muslim world too. And as Israel’s president has rightly noted, it is also found in secular movements, on the right and the left, and throughout the world.

>> My prime minister's Holocaust commemoration was one long obscenity; and it's not over | Opinion ■ 'Make Germany great again': How Trump has politicized Holocaust education in America | Opinion ■ Germany still has a Holocaust problem | Opinion ■ On this Holocaust Remembrance Day, let us forget | Opinion

This is the only possible explanation for why the governments of so many different countries routinely ignore the Iranian regime’s threats to destroy the Jewish state, threats that it repeats nonstop, openly and arrogantly. Back then they didn’t believe Hitler, today they don’t believe Khamenei.

Unfortunately, many Jews, then as now, also prefer to ignore the threats, to issue reassurances and even to lash out at those who do feel threatened. Granted, Khamenei is not Hitler, and Iran’s ability to realize its intentions against the Jews is far from that of Nazi Germany. But the aims, and this we must not forget, are the same.

Still, even if Iran does manage to build a bomb and to try to achieve what Israel-haters would like to see happen to the remnant of the Jewish people (whose numbers since the end of World War II have actually, and of its own doing, shrunk by some half a million people), there will not be another Holocaust.

The reason is absolutely clear: There is now a Jewish state. Only this nation-state — whether governed by the right or by the Zionist left — can fulfill the vow of the victims and the imperative of the survivors, whether or not their ancestors were in the inferno: Never again the railway transports, never again the crematoria. Never again will Jews dig the pits into which their bodies will be tossed after being shot. Never again.

Many world leaders make the pilgrimage to Yad Vashem, where they pay lip service and assert that “the world has changed.” If that is so, how did “the world” allow Bashar Assad to slaughter a half a million Syrians, and why didn’t “the world” stop Islamic State militants from beheading people on camera? Other terrible (and concealed) atrocities, carried out by Islamic State and other Islamic militant organization, are taking place in many places across the globe. And if all murderous means are fair in their eyes against their co-religionists, one can imagine the fate they have in mind for us, “the Zionist entity” that has settled in the sacred Muslim land and repudiate Allah and Mohammed, his prophet.

Over the past week, Jewish organizations around the world have published troubling statistics about the spread of anti-Semitism. A state of emergency was even declared in a few American cities. Necessary protective measures should be taken, but without exaggerating the threat to the personal safety of Jews in the Diaspora.

Just as there will not be a second Holocaust in Israel, there will not be one in America or in Europe. Barely any Jews are left in the Arab states, and if the few who have remained were to be in danger, I am absolutely certain that the Jewish state would find and rescue them, and not only because Article 6(s) of the Basic Law on Israel as the Nation-State of the Jewish People states: “The State shall strive to ensure the safety of members of the Jewish People and of its citizens, who are in trouble and in captivity, due to their Jewishness or due to their citizenship.”

The disturbing issue on this front is not immediate mortal danger, but the fact that the boundless hatred of Jews endures, generation after generation. In the past, because the Jews did not have stable ground beneath their feet — that is, a state — and now precisely because they do have a strong, stable and successful state.