Official: Man in Latest ISIS Execution Video May Be Related to Toulouse Attacker

Man, boy in video of Palestinian's shooting are French citizens, official says; investigators probing whether man seen praising attacks on Jews in video is Mohammed Merah's relative.

A man and a boy featured in a chilling Islamic State propaganda video showing the killing of a Palestinian have been identified as French citizens, and investigators are looking into whether the man is related to an extremist who attacked a Jewish school in southern France in 2012, an official told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

The official, who has close ties to intelligence services but was not authorized to speak publicly about the inquiry, also said another French fighter whose death in a suicide bombing was announced this week by Islamic State is a young teenager.

The man in the video, released late Tuesday, speaks with a southern French accent and looks like the step-brother of Mohammed Merah, who killed seven people in attacks on a Jewish school and paratroopers in the south of France beginning on March 11, 2012 — exactly three years ago. In the video, the man praises attacks on Jews "in your own stronghold in France" as he and the boy stand behind the man about to be killed.

In addition to the 2012 killings in Toulouse, Jews in a kosher supermarket were among the targets of three days of terror in the Paris area this year that left 20 people dead, including the three gunmen.

"Here are the young lions of the caliphate," the man says in the video. Soon afterward, the child is shown shooting the man in the head.

Mohamed Merah
AP

French government spokesman Stephane Le Foll described the video as a "dreadful" killing, but refused to comment Wednesday on the nationalities or identities of the man and boy.

The French official with intelligence ties also confirmed the nationality of a French fighter whose death was announced this week by the Islamic State group. The group said Abu Ali al-Firansi died in a suicide bombing in Tikrit. The French official described him as a young teen.

About 1,400 people, including entire families, have left France to join extremists in Syria and Iraq, and many have returned. Security officials fear some will arrive with honed skills as fighters, and with passports that allow free travel.

"Nearly 90 French citizens have died there, weapons in hand to fight against our values," French Prime Minister Manuel Valls told France's iTele on Sunday.

About 3,000 Europeans are part of the fight, Valls said, adding: "There could be 5,000 before the summer and without a doubt 10,000 by the end of the year."