Yemen's Houthis Say They Launched Second Drone Attack on Airport in Saudi Arabia

The group's Al Masirah TV said it targeted hangars containing war planes in Najran

Houthi supporters attend a rally to mark the first anniversary of the killing of Saleh al-Sammad, who was the head of Houthi movement's Supreme Political Council, by an air strike, in Sanaa, Yemen April 19, 2019.
\ MOHAMED AL-SAYAGHI/ REUTERS

Yemen's Iran-aligned Houthi movement launched a drone attack on Saudi Arabia's Najran airport, the group's Al Masirah TV said early on Wednesday.

It said it targeted hangars containing war planes. There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties. There was also no immediate comment from Saudi Arabia or the Saudi-led coalition.

On Tuesday, Houthi rebels said they targeted the airport in Najran with a Qasef-2K drone, striking an "arms depot." Najran, 840 kilometers (525 miles) southwest of Riyadh, lies on the Saudi-Yemen border and has repeatedly been targeted by the Iran-allied Houthis.

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The attacks on Najran comes as Iran quadrupled its uranium-enrichment production capacity amid tensions with the U.S. over Tehran's atomic program, nuclear officials said Monday, just after President Donald Trump and Iran's foreign minister traded threats and taunts on Twitter.

The New York Times last year reported that American intelligence analysts were based in Najran, assisting the Saudis and a U.S. Army Green Berets deployment on the border. The Pentagon and the U.S. military's Central Command did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Last week, the Houthis launched a coordinated drone attack on a Saudi oil pipeline amid heightened tensions between Iran and the U.S. Earlier this month, officials in the United Arab Emirates alleged that four oil tankers were sabotaged and U.S. diplomats relayed a warning that commercial airlines could be misidentified by Iran and attacked, something dismissed by Tehran.

Associated Press contibuted to this report.