Twenty-two Killed in Attack on Aden Airport Moments After New Yemen Cabinet Lands

TV footage showed dozens of people leaving the airplane and heavy gunfire from armored vehicles with plumes of white and black smoke rising from the scene

Reuters
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A military vehicle is seen on the tarmac as dust rises after explosions hit Aden airport, upon the arrival of the newly-formed Yemeni government in Aden, Yemen December 30, 2020.
A military vehicle is seen on the tarmac as dust rises after explosions hit Aden airport, upon the arrival of the newly-formed Yemeni government in Aden, Yemen December 30, 2020. Credit: FAWAZ SALMAN/ REUTERS
Reuters

At least 22 people were killed and dozens wounded in an attack on Aden airport on Wednesday, moments after a plane landed carrying a newly formed Saudi-backed cabinet for government-held parts of Yemen.

Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik said all members of the cabinet were "fine". But the attack underlined the difficulties facing a government intended by Saudi Arabia to unite two of its allies in the war against the Iran-aligned Houthi movement.

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Hours after the attack, a second explosion was heard around Aden's Maasheq presidential palace where the cabinet members including Maeen as well as the Saudi ambassador to Yemen, Mohammad Said al-Jaber, had been taken to safety, residents and local media said.

In the airport attack, loud blasts and gunfire were heard shortly after the plane arrived from Riyadh, witnesses said. A local security source said three mortar shells had landed on the airport's hall.

The cabinet gave the death figure on Twitter, citing the interior minister, and said 50 people were wounded. Medecins Sans Frontieres aid group had earlier said 17 people were treated for wounds at its hospital in Aden.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

The Saudi-led coalition said it had downed an explosive-laden Houthi drone that was targeting the presidential palace.

Bystanders and a soldier stand near a damaged portion of the airport of Yemen’s southern city of Aden’s after an explosion, Wednesday, December 30, 2020. Credit: Majid Saleh,AP

There was no immediate reaction from the Houthis, who denied responsibility for the airport attack.

"We and the members of the government are in the temporary capital of Aden and everyone is fine," Maeen tweeted from Maasheq palace. "The cowardly terrorist act that targeted Aden airport is part of the war that is being waged against the Yemeni state and its great people."

Jaber tweeted: "Peace, security and stability will prevail thanks to Yemenis' strong will and their brave government."

The new cabinet unites the government of President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi with southern separatists, intended to fulfil a Saudi aim of ending a feud among Riyadh's allies.

The two groups are the main Yemeni factions in a southern-based, Saudi-backed alliance fighting the Houthis who control the north, including the capital Sanaa.

ICRC staff members killed

TV footage from Saudi-owned Al Arabiya channel showed dozens of people leaving the airplane when a first blast hit the airport's hall. Heavy gunfire from armored vehicles followed, with plumes of white and black smoke rising from the scene.

Other video footage showed damage to the terminal's concrete walls and smashed glass.

Government officials were among the casualties in the airport attack, sources said. Two International Committee of the Red Cross staff members were killed in the airport attack and one was missing, ICRC said in a statement.

The southern port city of Aden has been mired in violence because of a rift between the separatists and Hadi's government, based there after being driven from the capital by the Houthis in 2014.

The separatist Southern Transitional Council (STC), which seeks independence for south Yemen, declared self-rule in Aden in April, triggering clashes and complicating United Nations efforts to forge a permanent ceasefire in the overall conflict.

The Saudi-led coalition announced the new power-sharing cabinet this month after more than a year of intense Saudi mediation between the government and the separatists.

The STC condemned the attack and accused the Houthi movement of responsibility.

U.N. Yemen envoy Martin Griffiths and several Arab countries condemned the attack.

"I wish the cabinet strength in facing the difficult tasks ahead," Griffiths said. "This unacceptable act of violence is a tragic reminder of the importance of bringing Yemen urgently back on the path towards peace." 

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