Syrian Army to End U.S. Presence in the Country, Claims State TV

The Pentagon announced in December that some 2,000 U.S. troops are currently deployed in Syria, in addition to setting up a coalition border security force that it aims to recruit with 30,000 fighters

Members of the Syrian government forces stand on a tank in southern Aleppo province as they advance in the ongoing offensive against opposition fighters on January 14, 2018.
GEORGE OURFALIAN/AFP

The Syrian army is determined to end any form of U.S. presence in the country, state television said on Monday, citing an official source in the foreign ministry. 

The U.S.-led coalition is working with Syrian militias to set up a new border force of 30,000 personnel. The move has also heightened Turkey's anger over U.S. support for Kurdish-dominated forces in Syria. 

To really understand the Middle East - subscribe to Haaretz

The Syrian foreign ministry blasted the U.S.-backed border force as a "blatant assault" on its sovereignty, state media had also said.

The U.S-led coalition in Syria says it has recruited 230 new cadets for the border security force it's establishing together with the Syrian Kurdish-led opposition fighters to secure areas recently liberated from Islamic State militants.

The force will be tasked with securing Syria's northern border with Turkey and the eastern border with Iraq.

The Pentagon announced in December that some 2,000 U.S. troops are currently deployed in Syria, raising the official count almost four times the previous figure of 500.