Two Israeli Arabs Charged With Spying for Hamas

Shin Bet says group exploited citizenship of men, who have families in Gaza, to commit offenses such as photographing sensitive Israeli security sites

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The Lod District Court.
The Lod District Court.Credit: Nir Keidar

Two Arab citizens of Israel were indicted Monday for spying on behalf of Hamas and for committing other security crimes. The State Prosecutor’s Office said the accused, Rami Alamudi and Rajib Dakha, were both born in the Gaza Strip and were dispatched to Israel on Hamas orders.

Alamudi, 30, a resident of Khan Yunis in the Strip, was born to an Israeli mother and a father from Gaza. Two years ago he renewed contact with his mother and in recent months, he was issued Israeli identity documents and moved to live with his mother in Israel proper.

Alamudi, 30, a resident of Khan Yunis in the Strip, was born to an Israeli mother and a father from Gaza.

Dakha, 34, has an Israeli mother, too, and originally lived in Gaza. In 2017, he was issued an Israeli passport and moved to Israel. His wife and five children remained in the Strip, and he visited once every few months.

According to the Shin Bet security service, members of Hamas' military wing recruited the two Israeli citizens who have relatives in Gaza, to collect intelligence on security-related goings-on in Israel, to be used to organize terrorist operations against Israeli targets. Hamas exploited the ability of the men to enter Gaza to visit their families, which made it easier for the military wing to recruit them, said the Shin Bet statement.

An investigation by the Shin Bet revealed that Dakha carried out a number of tasks at the behest of Hamas: He allegedly photographed military bases, police facilities and the location of Iron Dome batteries, and also passed on information concerning members of Israel’s security forces. Dakha also supplied Hamas with information on where rockets fell after being fired from Gaza in the most recent round of fighting.

As to Alamudi, the Shin Bet believes he purchased cellphones and SIM cards at the instructions of Hamas so as to keep in contact with the group.

Dakha, 34, has an Israeli mother, too, and originally lived in Gaza. In 2017, he was issued an Israeli passport and moved to Israel.

The Shin Bet said it views very seriously “the exploitation of Israeli citizens who have access to the Gaza Strip and Israel on behalf of terrorist operations,” and added that it will continue to act, along with Israel Police, to prevent any and all hostile, espionage-related activities on the part of terrorist organizations in the Strip.

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