Most of ISIS' Weapons Come From Iraqi Army, Amnesty Says

'Large and lethal arsenal' is the result of decades of reckless arms trading and poorly regulated arms flows into Iraq, rights group says.

In this file photo released on June 26, 2015, by supporters of the Islamic State militant group on an anonymous photo sharing website, Islamic State militants fire an anti-tank missile in Hassakeh, northeast Syria.
AP

Amnesty International says most of the Islamic State group's weapons were taken from the Iraqi army.

The international rights group says in a report released Tuesday that decades of reckless arms trading and poorly regulated arms flows into Iraq have contributed to ISIS' "large and lethal arsenal," which is being used to commit war crimes on a massive scale in Iraq and Syria.

Amnesty based its report on expert analysis of verified videos and images.

It says the weapons used by ISIS were manufactured and designed in more than two dozen countries, including Russia, China the U.S. and European states.