France's President Says He Has No 'Plan B' for Iran Nuclear Deal

Macron and Trump will discuss the Iran nuclear agreement at the White House on Tuesday, a senior U.S. administration official said on Friday

Reuters
Reuters
 In this Thursday, July 13, 2017 file photo, French President Emmanuel Macron and US President Donald Trump , right, walk in the courtyard of the Invalides as part of an official welcoming ceremony in Paris
In this Thursday, July 13, 2017 file photo, French President Emmanuel Macron and US President Donald Trump , right, walk in the courtyard of the Invalides as part of an official welcoming ceremony inCredit: AP Photo /Matthieu Alexandre, File
Reuters
Reuters

FrenchPresident Emmanuel Macron said he has no "plan B" for the Iran nuclear deal and that the United States should stay in the agreement as long as there is no better option.

In a Fox News interview on Sunday, the day before he arrives in Washington for a three-day state visit, Macron also said the United States, Franceand other allies will have a "very important" role to play in rebuilding Syria after they defeat Islamic State militants.

President Donald Trumphas said he wants U.S. forces to leave Syria as quickly as possible, but Macron warned that Iran, which has been Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's most supportive ally, will overrun Syria if the countries exit too quickly.

Macron and Trump will discuss the Iran nuclear agreement at the White House on Tuesday, a senior U.S. administration official said on Friday. They will also discuss the joint military strike on Syria this month following a suspected chemical weapons attack near Damascus, the official said.

The 2015 deal reached between Iran, the United States and five other world powers put curbs on Iran's nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief.

"I don't have any plan B," Macron said. "Let's present this framework because it's better than the sort of North Korean-type situation."

Macron, who said he and Trump have "a very special relationship," said he wanted to complete the Iran deal by addressing ballistic missiles and working to contain Iran's influence in the region.

Trump has called it one of the worst deals ever negotiated and will decide by May 12 whether to restore U.S. economic sanctions on Tehran, which would be a severe blow to the pact. Trump has pressured European allies to work with Washington to fix the deal.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said in a CBS interview on Sunday the United States would be viewed as an unreliable partner to the international community if it pulls out of the deal. He added that there would be no reason for Iran to remain in the deal if the United States leaves and the benefits for Iran start to diminish.

"This would be a very bad precedent if the United States sends this message to the international community that the length or the duration of any agreement would depend on the duration of the presidency," Zarif said.

Click the alert icon to follow topics:

Comments

SUBSCRIBERS JOIN THE CONVERSATION FASTER

Automatic approval of subscriber comments.

Subscribe today and save 40%

Already signed up? LOG IN

ICYMI

United Arab List chairman Mansour Abbas in the Knesset on Monday.

Arab Voters Will Decide if Israel's Far-right Wins Power

נתניהו עם כיפה שחורה על הראש נשען בשתי ידיו על הכותל

Israel Is Heading for Its Most 'Jewish' Election Ever

An El Al jet sits on the tarmac at John C. Munro International Airport in Hamilton, Thursday, in 2003.

El Al to Stop Flying to Toronto, Warsaw and Brussels

FILE PHOTO: A Star of David hangs from a fence outside the dormant landmark Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood in 2021.

American Judaism Is in Decline. That's Great News for American Jews

Crowds at Israel's Ben-Gurion International Airport, in April.

U.S. Official: West Bank Entry for Palestinian Americans Unrelated to Israeli Visa Waivers

Haaretz spoke with several people who said they had fled Ukraine, arrived in Israel,  and were asked to undergo DNA tests in order to establish paternity.

'My Jewish Grandmother Has a Number on Her Arm, Why Does Israel Greet Me This Way?'