Egyptian Military Court Sentences 14 to Death Over 2015 Alexandria Attacks

The fourteen were charged with attacking government buildings, planning to kill public figures and security officials, and joining the Muslim Brotherhood

People hold candles and national flags during a candlelight vigil for victims of a Friday mosque attack in Cairo, Egypt on November 27, 2017.
Amir Nabil/AP

An Egyptian military court on Sunday sentenced 14 people to death on charges of involvement in the 2015 attacks in the coastal city of Alexandria.

The defendants were charged with attacking government buildings, planning to kill public figures and security officials, and joining an outlawed group, a reference to the Muslim Brotherhood, designated by authorities as a terrorist organization.

The tribunal in Alexandria, north of Cairo, sentenced 24 others to 25 years in prison in the same case.

The court acquitted two senior members of the Muslim Brotherhood in the same case. The rulings can be appealed.

Rights advocates criticize the trying of civilians before military courts, saying they lack guarantees for a fair trial. 

Egypt has seen a surge in violence, including militant attacks mainly against security forces, since the military's 2013 toppling of democratically elected but divisive Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, who hails from the Muslim Brotherhood.