Egypt Signs Security Agreement With Uganda Amid Tensions Over Ethiopian Nile Dam

Uganda, where the Nile begins, and Egypt agree to 'share resourceful intelligence on a regular basis' as tensions over Ethiopia's dam continue

Reuters
Reuters
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The Uganda People's Defence Force parade at a ceremony to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the country's independence from British rule, in Kampala, Uganda, in 2012.
The Uganda People's Defence Force parade at a ceremony to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the country's independence from British rule, in Kampala, Uganda, in 2012.Credit: Rebecca Vassie / AP
Reuters
Reuters

Uganda and Egypt have signed a military intelligence sharing agreement, the east African country said late on Wednesday, against a backdrop of rising tensions between Egypt and Ethiopia over a hydropower dam on a tributary of the Nile River.

According to a statement by the Uganda People's Defense Forces (UPDF), the agreement was signed between UPDF's Chieftaincy of Military Intelligence (CMI) and the Egyptian Intelligence Department.

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"The fact that Uganda and Egypt share the Nile, cooperation between the two countries is inevitable because what affects Ugandans will in one way or other affect Egypt," Maj. Gen. Sameh Saber El-Degwi, a top Egyptian intelligence official who headed Cairo's delegation to Kampala, was quoted in the UPDF statement as saying.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has warned of the risk of conflict over the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) which Addis Ababa is building on the Blue Nile, one of the tributaries of the Nile.

Ethiopia is banking on the dam to boost its power generation capacity and fuel economic development but Egypt fears the project will imperil its fresh water supplies.

Sudan is also concerned about the impact on its own water flows.

Uganda, where the Nile begins, has historically opposed Egypt's attempts to exercise control over hydropower projects in upstream countries.

The two countries, according to the agreement, will now "share resourceful intelligence on a regular basis."

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