In Photos: Beirut Explosion Then and Now

People and places in Lebanon's capital: the damage caused by the massive port explosion two years ago and the rebuilding now

Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
A damaged building in the Gemmayzeh area in Beirut, on August 12 2020, left, and on August 1 2022, two years later.
A damaged building in the Gemmayzeh area in Beirut, on August 12 2020, left, and on August 1 2022, two years later.Credit: AFP
new-hdc-logo
Haaretz
new-hdc-logo
Haaretz

On August 4, Lebanon marked two years since the massive Beirut port explosion that killed over 200 people, wounded over 6,000 and destroyed a large part of the city.

The blast, that has also precipitated the demise of an already crumbling economy, flattened much of the city's port, damaging buildings and blowing out windows and doors as a giant mushroom cloud rose above the capital.

The August 2020 blast was caused by hundreds of tons of ammonium nitrate, a highly explosive material used in fertilizers, that had been improperly stored for years at the port’s warehouse.

Below are 11 images of people and places showing the damage then and the rebuilding now.

Karina Sukkar, a Lebanese architect and designer, on the balcony of her damaged apartment in Beirut's Mar Mikhael neighborhood in August 2020. Below she's on the balcony of the same apartment, now renovated, two years later.Credit: Patrick Baz/AFP
Antoun al-Ahwaji on the balcony of his renovated apartment in Beirut overlooking Beirut's grain silos on August 2 2022. Below he is injured, on August 6 2020.Credit: Patrick Baz/AFP
Leila Gholam in her renovated apartment in Beirut's Gemayzeh neighbourhood on July 29 2022. Below she is in her damaged house in August 6 2020, two days after the explosion.Credit: AFP
Pierre Mrad in his renovated shop in Beirut's Gemayzeh neighbourhood on August 1 2022. Below he is injured inside his destroyed shop in August 12 2020.Credit: AFP

A damaged building in the Gemmayzeh area in Beirut, taken on August 21 2020, left, and two years later on August 2 2022.Credit: AFP
A damaged building in the Gemmayzeh area in Beirut, on August 21 2020, left, and on August 2 2022.Credit: AFP
A damaged building in the Gemmayzeh area in Beirut, on August 12 2020, left, and on August 1 2022, two years later.Credit: AFP
A building damaged in 2020 in the Karantina neighbourhood of Beirut, on August 3 2022, top, and on November 5 2020.Credit: Joseph Eid/AFP
A traditional Beirut house damaged in 2020 on August 3 2022, top, and on August 11 2020.Credit: Joseph Eid/AFP
Buildings damaged in 2020 in the Gemmayzeh area of Beirut, on August 3 2022, top, and on September 3 2020.Credit: Joseph Eid/AFP

Click the alert icon to follow topics:

Comments

SUBSCRIBERS JOIN THE CONVERSATION FASTER

Automatic approval of subscriber comments.
From $1 for the first month

SUBSCRIBE
Already signed up? LOG IN

ICYMI

Charles Lindbergh addressing an America First Committee rally on October 3, 1941.

Ken Burns’ Brilliant ‘The U.S. and the Holocaust’ Has Only One Problem

The projected rise in sea level on a beach in Haifa over the next 30 years.

Facing Rapid Rise in Sea Levels, Israel Could Lose Large Parts of Its Coastline by 2050

Tal Dilian.

As Israel Reins in Its Cyberarms Industry, an Ex-intel Officer Is Building a New Empire

Queen Elizabeth II, King Charles III and a British synagogue.

How the Queen’s Death Changes British Jewry’s Most Distinctive Prayer

Newly appointed Israeli ambassador to Chile, Gil Artzyeli, poses for a group picture alongside Rabbi Yonatan Szewkis, Chilean deputy Helia Molina and Gerardo Gorodischer, during a religious ceremony in a synagogue in Vina del Mar, Chile last week.

Chile Community Leaders 'Horrified' by Treatment of Israeli Envoy

Queen Elizabeth attends a ceremony at Windsor Castle, in June 2021.

Over 120 Countries, but Never Israel: Queen Elizabeth II's Unofficial Boycott