In Latest Censorship Push, Turkey Blocks Access to Deutsche Welle and Voice of America

German broadcaster Deutsche Welle said it chose not to comply Turkey's licensing requirement, which 'would have allowed the Turkish government to censor editorial content'

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File: Protestors hold up newspapers to protest the jailing of Turkish journalists in Istanbul, 2016.
File: Protestors hold up newspapers to protest the jailing of Turkish journalists in Istanbul, 2016.Credit: Ozan Kose / AFP

Turkey’s media watchdog has banned access to the Turkish services of U.S. public broadcaster Voice of America and German broadcaster Deutsche Welle, leading to both websites being block as of Friday.

The Supreme Board of Radio and Television enforced a February warning to the two companies, which air television content in Turkish online, to apply for a broadcast license or be blocked. With no response five months later, an Ankara court ruled to restrict access to their websites.

In a statement, Deutsche Welle said it chose not to comply with the licensing requirement because it “would have allowed the Turkish government to censor editorial content.”

Director general Peter Limbourg said this was explained in detail to the Turkish radio and TV board, abbreviated as RTUK.

“For example, media licensed in Turkey are required to delete online content that RTUK interprets as inappropriate. This is simply unacceptable for an independent broadcaster. DW will take legal action against the blocking that has now taken place,” Limbourg said.

The German government said it took note of the reports “with regret.”

“Our concern about the state of freedom of opinion and the press in Turkey continues,” government spokesman Steffen Hebestreit said, adding that Germany is in a “regular, critical exchange” with Turkey on the issue.

Asked whether the German government can intervene in this case, Hebestreit noted that Deutsche Welle has said it plans to take legal action “and we have to wait for that.”

Ilhan Tasci, a RTUK member from Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party, said he opposed the move to block the two foreign broadcasters. “Here is press freedom and advanced democracy,” he tweeted sarcastically.

The move is based on an August 2019 regulation that says the RTUK would give 72-hour advance notice to unlicensed online media regarding when they had to apply and pay three months of licensing fees. Failure to do so could result in legal action against a media organization’s executives and access restricted.

In February, RTUK said it identified three websites without broadcast licenses, which also included the Turkish services of Euronews. But Euronews said it argued that it did not broadcast live in Turkish or air visual bulletins and was therefore exempt from the licensing requirements. TRT said it was newsgathering and reporting like any other international media but had to register as a foreign agent in 2020.

The RTUK board is dominated by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s ruling party and its nationalist allies, and regularly fines critical broadcasters.

The Journalists Union of Turkey called the decision censorship. “Give up on trying to ban everything you don’t like, this society wants freedom,” it tweeted.

Voice of America noted in February that while licensing for TV and radio broadcasts is a norm because broadcast airwaves are finite resources, the internet does not have limited bandwidth. “The only possible purpose of a licensing requirement for internet distribution is enabling censorship,” VOA said in a statement then.

State Department spokesman Ned Price tweeted when the licensing regulation emerged in February that the U.S. was concerned with RTUK’s “decision to expand government control over free press outlets.”

In response, Turkish Foreign Ministry spokesman Tanju Bilgic noted that the U.S. required Turkey’s state English-language broadcaster, TRT World, to register as a foreign agent under a law intended for lobbyists and public relations firms working for foreign governments. TRT said it was newsgathering and reporting like any other international media but had to register as a foreign agent in 2020.

“TRT abides by relevant regulations for its activities in the U.S. Is that censorship? We expect the same from @VoATurkish and others,” Bilgic tweeted.

Turkey was rated “Not Free” for 2021 on the Freedom of the Net index by Freedom House. Hundreds of thousands of domains and web addresses have been blocked.

Reporters Without Borders ranked Turkey at 149 out of 180 countries in its World Press Freedom Index, saying “all possible means are used to undermine critics,” including stripping journalists of press cards, online censorship, lawsuits and arrests.

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