U.S. Navy Says New Task Force to Patrol Red Sea Amid Yemen War

In January, the Houthis seized the Emirati-flagged ship Rwabee in the Red Sea off Yemen, posting videos depicting weapons being held on the ship, while the U.S. says the new force is meant to protect global trade

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A U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham and Egyptian Navy frigate ENS Alexandria conduct maneuvering-operation exercises in the Red Sea, February.
A U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham and Egyptian Navy frigate ENS Alexandria conduct maneuvering-operation exercises in the Red Sea, February.Credit: U.S. NAVAL FORCES CENTRAL COMM

The U.S. Navy said Wednesday it will establish a new task force with allied countries to patrol the Red Sea, a waterway crucial to global trade, after a series of attacks attributed to Yemen's Houthi rebels.

Vice Adm. Brad Cooper, who oversees the Navy's Mideast-based 5th Fleet, declined four times to directly name the Houthis in his remarks to journalists announcing the task force. However, the Houthis have launched explosive-laden drone boats and mines into the waters of the Red Sea, which runs from Egypt's Suez Canal in the north, down through the narrow Bab el-Mandeb Strait in the south that separates Africa from the Arabian Peninsula.

“In a macro sense, this region literally and figuratively fuels the world,” Cooper said. “The area is so vast that we just can't do it alone, so we're going to be at our best when we partner."

The Combined Maritime Forces command, a 34-nation organization which Cooper oversees from a base in Bahrain, already has three task forces that handle piracy and security issues both inside and outside the Persian Gulf. The new task force will be commissioned Sunday and will see the USS Mount Whitney, a Blue Ridge class amphibious command ship previously part of the Navy's African and European 6th Fleet, join it.

Cooper said he hoped the task force of two to eight ships at a time would target those smuggling coal, drugs, weapons and people in the waterway. Coal smuggling has been used by Somalia's al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab to fund their attacks. Weapons linked by the Navy and analysts to Iran have been intercepted in the region as well, likely on their way to the Houthis. Yemen also sees migrants from Africa try to cross its war-torn nation to reach jobs in Saudi Arabia and elsewhere.

A truce around the holy Muslim fasting month of Ramadan appears for now to be still be holding.

The Red Sea is a vital shipping lane for both cargo and the global energy supplies, making any mining of the area a danger not only to Saudi Arabia but to the rest of the world. Mines can enter the water and then be carried away by the currents, which change by the season in the Red Sea.

The Red Sea has been mined previously. In 1984, some 19 ships reported striking mines there, with only one ever being recovered and disarmed, a UN panel said.

In Yemen's current war, Houthi missile fire in the Red Sea has come near an American warship in the past. In October 2016, the U.S. Navy said the USS Mason came under fire from two missiles launched out of Yemen. Neither reached the warship, though the U.S. retaliated with Tomahawk cruise missile strikes on three coastal radar sites in Houthi-controlled territory.

More recently in January, the Houthis seized the Emirati-flagged ship Rwabee in the Red Sea off Yemen. The Saudi-led coalition asserted the ship carried medical equipment from a dismantled Saudi field hospital. The Houthis released video showing military-style inflatable rafts, trucks and other vehicles on the vessel, as well as rifles.

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