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Saudi Ambassador Dodges Question About Use of Cluster Bombs in Yemen

Prince Abdullah Al-Saud oddly repsonded, 'This is like the question, ‘Will you stop beating your wife?’'

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The site of an airstrike which witnesses said was carried out by the Saudi-led coalition on mourners at a funeral hall in Sanaa, Yemen, October 8, 2016.
The site of an airstrike which witnesses said was carried out by the Saudi-led coalition on mourners at a funeral hall in Sanaa, Yemen, October 8, 2016.Credit: Khaled Abdullah, Reuters

The United Nations' special envoy for Yemen is discussing a peace plan with both sides in the conflict during his second visit to the capital Sana'a in less than a week.

The U.N. said in a statement Friday that Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed arrived in the capital on Thursday and that he will meet with members of the diplomatic corps and others to discuss ways to alleviate the humanitarian suffering and assess the best ways to address the country's economic crisis.

"Negotiating peace frameworks is a tremendous undertaking under the best of circumstances," added the Special Envoy. "It requires an unequivocal determination of the parties to reach a negotiated settlement to put Yemen on the path to peace and that's what we are aiming for."

Early last week, a reporter from The Intercept asked the Saudi Ambassador to the U.S., “Will you continue to use cluster weapons in Yemen?”

Prince Abdullah Al-Saud oddly repsonded, “This is like the question, ‘Will you stop beating your wife?’”

“You are political operators I’m not a politician,” continued the ambassador when pressed again with the question.

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