Pusha T, Flying Lotus, of Montreal Among Headliners at New Israeli Music Festival

Meteor Festival to be held at the Pecan Park at Kibbutz Lahavot Habashan, offering world class acts thanks to a premium lineup that includes indie, electronic and hip-hop artists

Rapper Pusha T.
KENA BETANCUR/AFP

Nina Kraviz, Ariel Fink, Pusha T, of Montreal, Flying Lotus are among some 50 performers expected to come to Israel in September as part of the Meteor Festival.

The festival is being held for the first time in Israel, and concerts will be performed on five stages at the Pecan Park at Kibbutz Lahavot Habashan, offering world class acts thanks to a premium lineup that includes indie, dance and hip-hop artists. Israeli performers will also participate, and tickets will range from 200 to 625 shekels, depending on the day.

Pop group of Montreal in concert in Israel.
Moti Milrod

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The producer of the festival, Naranja company, brought the likes of Radiohead, Tame Impala and alt-J to Israel over the years. A great deal of thought and experience was given to the Meteor Festival lineup, which combines a number of styles, from hip-hop to heavy rock and techno. Judging by the excited responses on the internet, we can expect a good turnout for the shows.

Other participants include hip-hop producer Mura Masa, rappers Little Simz and Denzel Curry, saxophonist Kamasi Washington, Rhye and producer Henry Laufer, who goes by the name of Shlohmo.

In the realm of recording artists, the festival will also host top acts, such as Nina Kraviz and DJ Koze, who recently published a touted studio album, as well as key figures of gay clubbing, including Honey Dijon, Shanti Celeste, DJ Seinfeld, Soulwax, Helena Hauff, Leon Vynehall and Ivan Smagghe.

Local artists will perform, including the Balkan Beat Box, Boom Pam and Turkish singer Selda, Assaf Amdursky, Berry Sakharof, Zehava Ben, Raymonde Abecassis, Hila Ruach, the Zanovia duo from Haifa, and the Darfur Stars, a band comprised of asylum seekers from Darfur.

The festival is scheduled for September 6-8; its organizers said its creation “arises from a deep understanding that in current times the boundaries of different genres and scenes have been blurred and a broad bridge has been built among the various styles, generations and audiences.”