British Politician Under Fire for Branding Ed Miliband 'The Jew' in Arabic

Conservative city council candidate writes on Facebook: 'never ever will I drop that low and support the Al Yahud [Arabic for Jew] Lol.'

Reuters

A British Tory council candidate is under fire for apparently referring to Labor Party leader Ed Miliband as "the Jew."

According to the Jewish News Online, Conservative politician Gulzabeen Asfar, a city council candidate from Derby, posted a status on Facebook Saturday that read, “Just can’t take Mr Ed Miiband seriously!! DC has what it takes to be the future PM.”

When someone commented that she show some respect “for the future PM," Asfar replied, “Nah bro! never ever will I drop that low and support the Al Yahud [Arabic for Jew] Lol.”

After the remarks prompted outrage, a Conservative spokesman said Asfar's comment was "offensive and wrong. She has removed it and apologized."

However, according to the Jewish News, a Derby Labor spokesman criticized the comment, saying, “With anti-Semitism on the rise across Europe, it is abhorrent and terrifying that a prospective Conservative politician would say something like this.

“Derby Conservatives should launch an immediate investigation into this incident and take the appropriate action. Derby must be free from prejudice, especially from those seeking elected office.”

Jay Stoll, a member of the Jewish Leadership Council, told the British paper: “This is clearly unacceptable and the relevant authorities should investigate this matter swiftly.”

Earlier this month, a poll of Jewish voters in Britain showed that they found sitting Prime Minister David Cameron to have a better attitude toward the U.K.’s Jewish population than Labor leader Ed Miliband — 64 percent to 13 percent — even though Miliband is Jewish.

Around the same time the poll was published. Miliband also said he favored recognizing a Palestinian state if such a move would help bring about a broader peace deal in the Middle East.

Miliband said Labor backed a symbolic vote held last year in Britain's parliament in favor of recognizing Palestine.

"What we said at the time of that vote was that it was a vote about the principle of recognition," he said earlier this month. "And clearly a decision about when recognition would take place was dependent on how it would constructively help negotiations."